promotion image of download ymail app
Promoted
Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 8 years ago

Did you know that Galileo..?

Who is sometimes refereed to as "the father of modern science", considered becoming a Priest in his formidable years? Did you know that his eldest daughter was "Sister" Maria Celeste? Apparently, Galileo had strong ties to the Catholic Church. So atheists what do you think of that? He was tried for his position on heliocentrism, but remained devoted to the Catholic Church. Your thoughts...

Update:

"referred to" I meant to say. Damn spell checker. True he was locked up, and yet astonishingly remained loyal to the Church.

Update 2:

Thanks for your thoughts.

16 Answers

Relevance
  • 8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Nicolaus Copernicus (1473–1543), a Catholic clergyman and scientist theorized a comprehensive heliocentric cosmology, which placed the Sun at the fixed center of the universe instead of the Earth (which, by the way, was wrong). This theory was widely accepted as a legitimate theory in the scientific world of the time. Tools like telescopes had not yet been invented to help prove the theory.

    Galileo (1564–1642) improved the telescope and was able to record astronomical observations that supported but did not prove Copernicus. In 1611, he made a triumphant visit to Rome, where Pope Paul V assured him of his support and good will.

    Galileo felt that he had to convince the world that heliocentricism was true without further evidence. If he had just stated that Copernicanism was a hypothesis, one superior to the Ptolemiaic (geocentric) system, until further proof could be found (as the scientific method requires) then he would not have gotten into trouble.

    Instead Galileo said that the scientific community and the Church either had to accept Copernicanism as a fact (even though it had not been proved) and reinterpret Scripture accordingly; or they had to condemn it. He allowed no middle room. It was Galileo's pride and arrogance that got him into trouble, not his science.

    By the way, the heliocentric theory that claimed the sun was the fixed center of the universe instead of the Earth, was also incorrect. The sun is the center of the solar system but not the universe and the sun itself moves, it is not fixed.

    The Church quickly got over Galileo's excesses. Pope Benedict XIV granted an imprimatur (an official approval) to the first edition of the Complete Works of Galileo in 1741.

    “[Galileo] declared explicitly that the two truths, of faith and of science, can never contradict each other, 'Sacred Scripture and the natural world proceeding equally from the divine Word, the first as dictated by the Holy Spirit, the second as a very faithful executor of the commands of God', as he wrote in his letter to Father Benedetto Castelli on 21 December 1613. The Second Vatican Council says the same thing, even adopting similar language in its teaching: 'Methodical research, in all realms of knowledge, if it respects... moral norms, will never be genuinely opposed to faith: the reality of the world and of faith have their origin in the same God' (Gaudium et Spes, 36). Galileo sensed in his scientific research the presence of the Creator who, stirring in the depths of his spirit, stimulated him, anticipating and assisting his intuitions”: John Paul II, Address to the Pontifical Academy of Sciences (10 November 1979): Insegnamenti, II, 2 (1979), 1111-1112. From the Vatican website: http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/enc...

    For more information, see:

    + http://www.catholic.net/rcc/Periodicals/Issues/Gal...

    + http://www.catholic.com/library/Galileo_Controvers...

    + Galileo, Science, and the Church (1992) by Jerome J. Langford

    + The Devil’s Delusion: Atheism and its Scientific Pretensions (2009) by David Berlinski

    + Seven Lies About Catholic History (2010) by Diane Moczar

    With love in Christ

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Owl
    Lv 6
    8 years ago

    "The drama of Galileo's trial by the Inquisition in 1633 has cast him as a renegade astronomer who scoffed at the Bible and drew fire from a Church blind to reason. Indeed, the myth of the martyred Galileo perfectly symbolizes the current division between science and faith. But the real Galileo, never tortured or excommunicated, remained a loyal Catholic throughout his life."

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/physics/galileo-sobel...

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 8 years ago

    Yes. I am familiar with the story of the life of Galileo Galilei, and I knew about both of his daughters who entered the Convent of San Matteo in Arcetri. However I am atheist, (ie someone who does not believe in any God) simply because there is no evidence to support the claim that any God exists. So in my view whatever Galileo Galilei did or did believe is irrelevant, and does not have anything to do with why I am atheist.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 4 years ago

    "ought to Christians end unbelief...?" they'd, in the event that they have been keen to replace their worldview so it turns into consistent with how actuality truly operates. a great commence would be to finally admit that God has continually been a conceptual psychological abstraction and has on no account been element of the point actual realm. the main profound cultural impacts, at the two the guy and cultural tiers, have continually been hassle-free suggestions. persons will improve outdated and die, yet their ideal techniques would proceed to exist and proceed to strengthen the human situation. Ignoring the superstitious nonsense in the Bible, whilst assiduously emphasizing Christianity's significant ethical precepts, ought to return Christianity to cultural relevance and make its ethical message palatable to a civilization which now embraces naturalism and empiricism. persevered tries via fundamentalists to discredit the real awareness humanity has got here across for itself using fact the Bible became created only accelerates the day while Christianity would be seen mere mythology. As for "compelling information" on par with Copernicus, Galileo, and Kepler -- there purely is none, a minimum of no longer if the keepers of the religion proceed to belligerently insist historic Hebrew human beings memories are incontrovertible Divine revelation that would desire to on no account be interpreted metaphorically. the reason at the back of Christianity's present day decline isn't a loss of mandatory information, yet fairly the belligerent refusal via self-appointed keepers of the religion to permit the metaphorical interpretations mandatory to maintain the Bible's message proper to the individuals of our present day civilization.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • 8 years ago

    I come to a different conclusion. So what if Galileo thought that the heliocentric view of the solar system was consistent with Catholicism? I think it is too. But that's not the problem with Catholicism - the basic premise that god exists is fundamentally unsupported by evidence.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    Yes. Largely because his family was poor, and at the time that was one of the few ways a poor person could get a decent education. It wasn't out of a strong "faith" or desire to "serve" the church.

    Did you mean "formative" years instead of "formidable" years, by the way?

    Peace.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 8 years ago

    He remained "devoted" just to stay alive. The church would let him live as long as he disavowed his "heretical" conclusions, which he did while basically crossing his fingers. After saying essentially "I take it all back" he muttered "and yet it moves," which meant he still believed in exactly what he was pursuing. He was then placed under house arrest for the rest of his life.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    Everyone had strong ties to the church then. The church controlled society.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • 8 years ago

    yes, so much for the myth that galileo was anti catholic

    there are as many atheist myths a pagan greek

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    No, I did not know that.

    My thoughts about Galileo do not change because of the newly acquired knowledge. He was a coward.

    • Commenter avatarLogin to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.