where is bruce golding?

former jamaican prime minister

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  • 8 years ago
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    amaica was presented as a narco-state to the entire international community, overrun and controlled by traficante dollars from Colombia. It was a watershed series of events, culminating in the State wiping out more of its citizens than at any other time since the 1865 rebellion.

    Instead of a thorough investigation into it, we were all treated to a spectacular sideshow, after which we really don't know why so many people had to die, and who was putting down the dollars to pay for the Government's conspiracy against the people's interests.

    So what happened to Bruce Golding? Why did he gallop away from Jamaica House so quickly and with such little explanation? Should Jamaicans be satisfied with scant information about the first time in its history a prime minister has left or been removed in such mystery and haste? Don't we have a right to know?

    It offends the dilettante historian and political scientist in me that with the copious communication coming out of the Government and the governing party, there is no unambiguous statement about the reasons for Golding's departure. Why should we all have to hypothesise and guess about something of such importance?

    For example, there is rife speculation that an order from overseas caused Golding to cut out. That's one theory. If not an actual order, was it another kind of blunt or subtle pressure? It is no secret that the USA was taking a keen interest in the Dudus debacle.

    Another theory is that Mr Golding was in fear of something else, perhaps more visa cancellations or another extradition request. It would be good to be able to dismiss this out of hand, but again, based on the history, we cannot.

    A third theory is that Mr Golding ran out of internal party support, and that despite all the staged appearances of peace and love and unity, there was, in effect, an internal coup d'etat. According to this version, Golding's 'last lick' was to crush the leadership ambitions of his main detractors.

    Depressed gladiator?

    Yet another theory is that he had become dispirited, depressed and tired. Perhaps he had just had enough of it all. If this is so, despite a remarkable accumulation of errors, one feels a twinge of sympathy for the retiring gladiator.

    A fifth theory is that Mr Golding made a simple calculation that he had become unviable and politically toxic. On this view, as a party man to the very end, he, therefore, just engineered a three-card trick by shedding the most obvious baggage - himself.

    Finally, it could be a little of all of the above or some combination thereof.

    There is a basic trust and reciprocity that a leader has to establish between herself or himself and the populace. If any such was genuine in Golding's case, or if there is any left, would he not want to explain his resignation fully?

    Golding's recent comments from the JLP conference platform would suggest that his primary concern in demitting office was to engineer a political manoeuvre to keep his party in power. The Gleaner noted that Golding had painted himself as a "master strategist" when he said, "What a difference that play has made on the political landscape ... ."

    Well, if the departure was pure expediency based on negative polling, we must acknowledge that he performed his trick flawlessly. Had Mr Golding been an adviser to David Smith, OLINT would probably be alive and kicking.

    However much he was being asked to "pack his bags and go", Mr Golding's remarks didn't acknowledge that there was a legitimate basis for asking him to leave. That seemed entirely beside the point.

    A plea for Christmas without politics

    All the indications are that Mr Holness is to hand us a general election right in the heart of the Christmas season. The parties are getting in gear, the flags are everywhere, and the mass meetings are planned.

    Now I'm going to have to be talking and arguing about politics over Christmas pudding and sorrel. Cho, man! Instead of Christmas carols, we will hear jarring political advertisements, and it will all be about where to put the 'X'. So now it really is 'Xmas' and not 'Christmas'.

    I have an abiding aversion for all religious and secular fundamentalists alike who don't respect the religious holidays. For Christ's sake, leave Christmas alone!

    Source(s): Good Luck
  • fowkes
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    optimistically he will, plus it became time for a transformation. New leaders oftentimes attempt to make a distinction and maximum start up off properly. If background bodes he will make an result. He has journey and help from the human beings.

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