Is n't the ocean such a big thing?

The ocean is such a big thing. I have read that water occupies two thirds of earth's surface. I could comprehend it. The earth is such a big thing. I have read that Sun is 100 times larger than the Earth. I could comprehend it. The universe is such a big thing. No one can tell whether it is finite or... show more The ocean is such a big thing. I have read that water occupies two thirds of earth's surface. I could comprehend it.

The earth is such a big thing. I have read that Sun is 100 times larger than the Earth. I could comprehend it.

The universe is such a big thing. No one can tell whether it is finite or infinite. It is, at least, beyond my comprehension.

I am a teacher with a doctorate degree. I can not comprehend my own mind. The more I know about it, I will come to know that there is more about it.
Update: In Latin, the aphorism "Know thyself" is generally given as nosce te ipsum. In Charmides (dialogue), Plato has Socrates lead a longer inquiry as to how we may gain knowledge of ourselves. “Wisdom begins with wonder,” said Socrates. Through dialogue, he led his audience to passionate inquiry of existence... show more In Latin, the aphorism "Know thyself" is generally given as nosce te ipsum. In Charmides (dialogue), Plato has Socrates lead a longer inquiry as to how we may gain knowledge of ourselves.

“Wisdom begins with wonder,” said Socrates. Through dialogue, he led his audience to passionate inquiry of existence and identity. In his mind, one could not know anything without knowing one’s self. Thus, the Seven Sages of Greece, who had inscribed "know thyself" in the forecourt of the Delphic oracle a few generations before Socrates, had challenged all subsequent philosophers to attain self-knowledge before knowing anything else.

In 1750 Benjamin Franklin, in his Poor Richard's Almanack, observed the great difficulty of knowing one's self, with: "There are three Things extremely hard, Steel, a Diamond, and to know one's self."
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