Are you required to show I.D. to police in California?

Technically, yes, I'm underage. I was out past curfew walking around to burn off energy because I was in a bad mood, and someone apparently called the police—however I wasn't aware walking was considered a crime. Here's the thing: I know for a fact that you're not required to present I.D. to... show more Technically, yes, I'm underage. I was out past curfew walking around to burn off energy because I was in a bad mood, and someone apparently called the police—however I wasn't aware walking was considered a crime.

Here's the thing: I know for a fact that you're not required to present I.D. to police in California unless I'm under suspicion of a crime. I wasn't under suspicion of a crime per se, and although I was out past curfew, they don't know my age. And I'm not required to show I.D., so unless I'm actually breaking laws, I don't believe they had a right to detain me. Beyond that however, the officer insisted that I was required to show I.D. to police when requested, because "when you signed that paper to get your I.D., you agreed to it". Here's the thing though... him doing that was slightly manipulative. I understand that it's within his right to lie to obtain consent/identification/etc. (Frazier v. Cupp, 394 U.S. 731, 739 (1969) I believe), but I don't think it's within his right to handcuff me then check my I.D. anyway. I'm very upset about this, and although I was breaking curfew, I wasn't breaking any serious laws.

I'm 17. I know that I only have to show I.D. when I'm driving a motor vehicle or when I'm being lawfully detained. So if possible, may I have the legal section and article according to the California code? I can't seem to find it anywhere and I've been searching. I need reinforcement, so I can print proof of this law.

Any help would be awesome! Thanks.
Update: Blake, here's the situation: I called the police department shortly after and asked for all information relevant. They said they received two calls (possibly from the same person). I was not walking near any houses, I was walking near a busy intersection in my town. There was no reasonable suspicion of a crime... show more Blake, here's the situation: I called the police department shortly after and asked for all information relevant. They said they received two calls (possibly from the same person). I was not walking near any houses, I was walking near a busy intersection in my town. There was no reasonable suspicion of a crime that had been committed, and I asked the sergeant that until he answered me the correct answer. He simply said that a couple of people called and said I was "loitering" at the intersection. Thing is, there were no loitering signs and beyond that, it's public property. I was breaking no laws beyond curfew laws. There wasn't any real reasonable suspicion. They have the right to detain me if there's reasonable suspicion of a crime that had been committed, and I argued that to him. I had asked the sergeant plenty a time if there were any calls of me supposedly attempting to break into a business or break into a car—he said no. So where's the reasonable
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