Does a cbc always show leukemia?

I'm not a paranoid teen. My boyfriend's mom mentioned it to me. I've been anemic, getting b12 shots, on vitimins for over a year. I was still anemic so I was infused with iron (3 treatments, once a week) and my counts are now pretty normal but still vit. D, B, and C deficient. I'm still taking iron too. I'm labeled fine but I feel like I'm being treated with bandaids. I'm always tired, joints hurt, stomach pain, dizzy, and nateous. I know some are prob explained by wat I'm taking. My boyfriend's mom said that's how her sister was before she got diagnosed. Any thoughts? Do I need a new doctor?

Update:

I never said acute. And my rbcs are larger lately but not a concern. I feel like my drs aren't doing anything but ignoring me. I'm 22 I shouldn't need infusions and if I do that shouldn't make them think I'm magically better.

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  • 9 years ago
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    Cbc refers to a cellular blood count. In other words a count of all the red and white bloods cells in a drop of your blood. Anemia means you have too few red blood cells. That can be caused by several things. The vitamin B12 shots you are receiving are available in a daily tablet form. so you'll look less like a pin cushion.

    Leukemia is cancer that starts in the tissue that forms blood.

    Symptoms

    Like all blood cells, leukemia cells travel through the body. The symptoms of leukemia depend on the number of leukemia cells and where these cells collect in the body.

    People with chronic leukemia may not have symptoms. The doctor may find the disease during a routine blood test.

    People with acute leukemia usually go to their doctor because they feel sick. If the brain is affected, they may have headaches, vomiting, confusion, loss of muscle control, or seizures. Leukemia also can affect other parts of the body such as the digestive tract, kidneys, lungs, heart, or testes.

    Common symptoms of chronic or acute leukemia may include:

    Swollen lymph nodes that usually don't hurt (especially lymph nodes in the neck or armpit)

    Fevers or night sweats

    Frequent infections

    Feeling weak or tired

    Bleeding and bruising easily (bleeding gums, purplish patches in the skin, or tiny red spots under the skin)

    Swelling or discomfort in the abdomen (from a swollen spleen or liver)

    Weight loss for no known reason

    Pain in the bones or joints

    Most often, these symptoms are not due to cancer. An infection or other health problems may also cause these symptoms. Only a doctor can tell for sure.Symptoms

    Like all blood cells, leukemia cells travel through the body. The symptoms of leukemia depend on the number of leukemia cells and where these cells collect in the body.

    People with chronic leukemia may not have symptoms. The doctor may find the disease during a routine blood test.

    People with acute leukemia usually go to their doctor because they feel sick. If the brain is affected, they may have headaches, vomiting, confusion, loss of muscle control, or seizures. Leukemia also can affect other parts of the body such as the digestive tract, kidneys, lungs, heart, or testes.

    Common symptoms of chronic or acute leukemia may include:

    Swollen lymph nodes that usually don't hurt (especially lymph nodes in the neck or armpit)

    Fevers or night sweats

    Frequent infections

    Feeling weak or tired

    Bleeding and bruising easily (bleeding gums, purplish patches in the skin, or tiny red spots under the skin)

    Swelling or discomfort in the abdomen (from a swollen spleen or liver)

    Weight loss for no known reason

    Pain in the bones or joints

    Most often, these symptoms are not due to cancer. An infection or other health problems may also cause these symptoms. Only a doctor can tell for sure.

    You can read more about it here.

    http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/wyntk/leukemia/...

  • 5 years ago

    Myelogenous leukemias manifestations are immature WBCs, anemia, fatigue, bruising, bleeding problems such as nose bleeds, bone pain. It could also display enlarged lymph nodes, spleen, and liver with tenderness. Also unexplained weight loss, fever, headaches, visual disturbance, nausea, vomiting, seizures, coma. I would ask your doctor a lot of questions regarding Leukemia. I would bring it to their attention. If you had cancer before, they should be a little more alert for other conditions. The diagnostic criteria would display a blood cell count of immature WBCs greater than 20% and microscopic exam of blood cells would be needed.

  • 9 years ago

    A CBC with a look at the peripheral blood smear under a microscope

    by an experienced observer like a hematologist or a pathologist

    should NEVER miss any of the many types of leukemia

    acute or chronic, myelocytic or lymphocytic, or any of their subtypes.

    Source(s): MD Medical Oncologist and Hematologist - a cancer and blood specialist doctor - with twenty years experience
  • 9 years ago

    If your Dr is not providing you with answers then see a new Dr.

    Have they looked at your diet? Long term vitamin deficiency should start there.

    Have you seen an endocrinologist and gastroenterologist? If your dietary intake is fine and you are still deficient then malabsorbsion or enzyme inbalance would probably be another place to look for problems.

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  • 9 years ago

    You take second opinion and then trust your DOC.

    Source(s): WW
  • Babak
    Lv 5
    9 years ago

    no

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