Theoretically uncrackable encryption algorithm?

Most encryption algorithms are vulnerable to the "brute force" attack in theory but not in practice. For example, even 512-bit or 1024-bit encryption is theoretically crackable. It might take you 10^20 years even if you linked all computers on Earth into one massively-parallel supercomputer. Or, assuming each computer operation takes a finite quanta of energy, the number of operations required would be greater than the total amount of energy available in the universe.

Clearly such encryption is good enough for practical applications but it's still theoretically crackable. I was wondering if any algorithms exist which are not, meaning even if you have unlimited energy, time, memory, and speed... it won't help you at all.

4 Answers

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  • 8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    The one-time pad has been proven to be uncrackable. It requires you to exchange a 'pad' of data with the person you want to communicate with, and the 'pad' is also consumable.

    For example, you could give a friend a 1 gig memory stick with a pad on it and they would do the same the same. You could then each transmit 1 gig of data encrypted before the pad was used up, and be 100% certain that the data couldn't be decrypted. This assumes that your pads are totally random, which can be a tricky thing to achieve.

    There is some talk about fractal encryption being quantum resistant, but it would still theoretically be crackable I think, just very difficult.

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  • Jessie
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    I'm not too sure about this question. The only encryption algorithm that I know of is the one that is used by my StompSoft's Digital Vault encryption software. That is 256 bit Blowfish Encryption. As to whether it is more secure than one or the other is more than likely debatable.

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  • Ben
    Lv 4
    8 years ago

    No such thing exists, the closest you can get is to encrypt using a method that is not in use elsewhere. That way no known method of cracking will work, but even then, if there's enough encrypted material to study, it is possible to figure out the method used, and once figured out, it can be broken. If it wasn't capable of being cracked, it also wouldn't be capable of being decrypted for your own use.

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  • 8 years ago

    I am not a programmer but I understand what are you trying to say. Seems logical to me. Unless the algorithm is irrational (infinite like pi) the sequence can be seen.

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