After getting engaged my fiance cant even put my name towards our house, why?

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  • 9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Take this as a huge red flag and a sign of things to come. Why not indeed. Sounds like he wants to be the one that "owns" the house and he won't let you ever forget it. Sounds like positioning for the controlling one sided relationship he has in mind.

    If I were you I would ask him why he is doing this? Why wouldn't your name be on the deed to what is going to be your home? If he says any nonsense like he is the one with the job and the money and he will have to pay, you come right back at him and ask if he intends to pay you for your work in thehome cooking cleaning etc, especially etc because if that is how he views things he needs to pay you for your work so you can invest in Your home

    If you have a job that shoots down that lame arguement. This would be a deal breaker for me. I advise you to take off the wedding tinted glasses and take a cold hard look at the man you intend to spend your life with. I don't think he is who you think he is... and you already know that he is not if you admit the truth. You know you do.

  • 9 years ago

    So many reasons/issues why not, most of them with the loan officer of where he is getting the loan.

    The bank and your fiance only want your signature if you can bring something to the table, like a great credit rating, or a big salary. Otherwise, not. You could actually hurt the deal if you have no credit rating, or a poor one.

    I have seen recommendations out there for only one person to own the house. that way, it can't be contested in a divorce if it is owned by only one person before the marriage.

    And, if he is buying the house before you are married, and you sign, if he defaults, you could have your credit ruined for life, and have a huge debt. Legally, until you are married, he can charge you to lease your share of the house!

    www.directlendingsolutions.com/cosign-a-​loan.htm:

    It is your better credit rating that makes you eligible to cosign a loan. If you are considering cosigning a loan for someone, you must bear in mind that it is also your credit rating that is on the line. If the person receiving the loan defaults and you are unable to take financial responsibility for the loan, failing to repay it in a timely fashion, your credit standing will be damaged.

    In fact, not only could you stand to lose that better credit rating, but also – depending upon the amount of the loan and your ability to pay it back in the event of a default on the part of the borrower – your home. That is because if the borrower defaults and you are not in the financial position to be able to repay the loan, the lender has the right – thanks to your signature on the loan – to take legal action against you to collect, even forcing the sale of your home if the amount to be collected is great enough.

  • Derek
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    Why should your name go on it? You are not the one buying it-He is. In most states, property acquired before marriage is considered non-marital and therefore a protected asset in the event of a divorce. Also in fairnesss to him, your name should only go on it IF you are providing half of the down payment and half of the mortgage payment, insurance, property taxes, the cost of maintenance etc.

    Also consider that being married or single can affect a persons credit rating. In most cases, a married couple with two incomes will have a credit rating higher than an individual-meaning that a married couple can often get a lower interest rate because they have a better credit rating. What does your credit rating look like? Are you solidly employed and a good saver without much, if any, debt? How does his credit trating compare with yours? All those factors could be reasons not to have your name on the title or mortgage.

    Source(s): been there..... See books by financial adviser Dave Ramsey. (DaveRamsey.com) He advises that couples never buy property together until AFTER the wedding. As another answer states, buying with a fiance can lead to financial disaster. You don't marry a persons assets, you marry a person.
  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    If you mean to put your name on the title of the house, there are several horror stories I can tell you about guys putting their fiance's name on a house he paid for and something happens and they break up and the girl takes half the house. I wouldn't think about doing it until after the wedding vows are complete.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Hes probably waiting to see if the marriage is gonna work out first. Can you blame him? He may also be waiting to refinance it with your name. Ask him if he has EVER refinanced it before for the newest cheaper rate and see what he says. If your married long enough then you will get half anyway.

    Source(s): Lifes experiences at 49.
  • BBG
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    "Engaged" means nothing.

    Why do you think that a single person ought share title to a property with another single person (unless other single person is an equal financial contributor)?

    You are wrong to expect the security of marriage before you are married.

  • 5204
    Lv 6
    9 years ago

    If you are not contributing toward the down payment he doesn't have to add you but that's not a good beginning for a marriage.

  • Kelly
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    He didn't tell me either...

  • ?
    Lv 6
    9 years ago

    Ask him?

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