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Anonymous asked in Social ScienceEconomics · 9 years ago

Imperialism/Post-Colonial Period in Rwanda?

I need to write a two page paper on the movie Hotel Rwanda which I've seen a dozen times. Although I know what the movie is about I just wanted some feed back on what I should put in my paper regarding imperialism and/or the post-colonial period. I'm also a bit confused on the post-colonial period in general and how it fits in with Rwanda. I thought it meant where colonial countries became independent, but Rwanda isn't truly independent are they? Anyway, I basically just want some ideas that I could put into my paper about the movie.

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  • 9 years ago
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    Rwanda experienced Africa's worst genocide in modern times, and the country's recovery was marred by its intervention in the conflict in neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo.

    The country has been beset by ethnic tension associated with the traditionally unequal relationship between the dominant Tutsi minority and the majority Hutus.

    Although after 1959 the ethnic relationship was reversed, when civil war prompted around 200,000 Tutsis to flee to Burundi, lingering resentment led to periodic massacres of Tutsis.

    The most notorious of these began in April 1994. The shooting down of the plane carrying President Juvenal Habyarimana, and his Burundian counterpart, near Kigali triggered what appeared to be a coordinated attempt by Hutus to eliminate the Tutsi population.

    In response, the Tutsi-led Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) launched a military campaign to control the country. It achieved this by July, by which time at least 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus had been brutally massacred.

    Some two million Hutus fled to Zaire, now the DR Congo. They included some of those responsible for the massacres, and some joined Zairean forces to attack local Tutsis. Rwanda responded by invading refugee camps dominated by Hutu militiamen.

    Meanwhile, Laurent Kabila, who seized control of Zaire and renamed it the DR Congo, failed to banish the Hutu extremists, prompting Rwanda to support the rebels trying to overthrow him.

    Rwanda withdrew its forces from DR Congo in late 2002 after signing a peace deal with Kinshasa. But tensions simmer, with Rwanda accusing the Congolese army of aiding Hutu rebels in eastern DR Congo.

    Rwanda has used traditional "gacaca" community courts to try those suspected of taking part in the 1994 genocide. But key individuals - particularly those accused of orchestrating the slaughter - appear before an International Criminal Tribunal in northern Tanzania.

    The country is striving to rebuild its economy, with coffee and tea production being among its main sources of foreign exchange. Nearly two thirds of the population live below the poverty line.

    A chronology of key events:

    1300s - Tutsis migrate into what is now Rwanda, which was already inhabited by the Twa and Hutu peoples.

    1600s - Tutsi King Ruganzu Ndori subdues central Rwanda and outlying Hutu areas.

    Late 1800s - Tutsi King Kigeri Rwabugiri establishes a unified state with a centralised military structure.

    1858 - British explorer Hanning Speke is the first European to visit the area.

    1890 - Rwanda becomes part of German East Africa.

    1916 - Belgian forces occupy Rwanda.

    1923 - Belgium granted League of Nations mandate to govern Ruanda-Urundi, which it ruled indirectly through Tutsi kings.

    1946 - Ruanda-Urundi becomes UN trust territory governed by Belgium.

    Independence

    1957 - Hutus issue manifesto calling for a change in Rwanda's power structure to give them a voice commensurate with their numbers; Hutu political parties formed.

    1959 - Tutsi King Kigeri V, together with tens of thousands of Tutsis, forced into exile in Uganda following inter-ethnic violence.

    1961 - Rwanda proclaimed a republic.

    1962 - Rwanda becomes independent with a Hutu, Gregoire Kayibanda, as president; many Tutsis leave the country.

    1963 - Some 20,000 Tutsis killed following an incursion by Tutsi rebels based in Burundi.

    1973 - President Gregoire Kayibanda ousted in military coup led by Juvenal Habyarimana.

    1978 - New constitution ratified; Habyarimana elected president.

    1988 - Some 50,000 Hutu refugees flee to Rwanda from Burundi following ethnic violence there.

    1990 - Forces of the rebel, mainly Tutsi, Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) invade Rwanda from Uganda.

    1991 - New multi-party constitution promulgated.

    Genocide

    1993 - President Habyarimana signs a power-sharing agreement with the Tutsis in the Tanzanian town of Arusha, ostensibly signalling the end of civil war; UN mission sent to monitor the peace agreement.

    1994 April - Habyarimana and the Burundian president are killed after their plane is shot down over Kigali; RPF launches a major offensive; extremist Hutu militia and elements of the Rwandan military begin the systematic massacre of Tutsis. Within 100 days around 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus are killed; Hutu militias flee to Zaire, taking with them around 2 million Hutu refugees.

    1994-96 - Refugee camps in Zaire fall under the control of the Hutu militias responsible for the genocide in Rwanda.

    1995 - Extremist Hutu militias and Zairean government forces attack local Zairean Banyamulenge Tutsis; Zaire attempts to force refugees back into Rwanda.

    1995 - UN-appointed international tribunal begins charging and sentencing a number of people responsible for the Hutu-Tutsi atrocities.

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