What is the ISS used for?

I was wondering about the International Space Station. like what is it made of, what is it used for, how did they piece it together, and how long will it be in orbit, and finally what orbit is it in like the GEO, MEO?

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  • 9 years ago
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    The ISS is made of loads of metals and ceramics ie conventional aluminum for the main body , reinforced carbon on leading edge of wing , silica-based insulation material and similar materials for heat-resistant tiles .

    It is used for experiments in biology, human biology, physics, astronomy, meteorology and other fields.The station is suited for the testing of spacecraft systems and equipment required for missions to the Moon and Mars it was also planned to act as a staging base for possible future missions to the Moon, Mars and asteroids

    They sent it up in pieces in segments and constructed it in space via space walks and other means like the Canadarm2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadarm

    It is funded till 2020 but could continue in orbit til 2022

    Every time a NASA shuttle mission is launched the ISS allows itself to drop lower to the Earth this makes it so heaver loads can reach the ISS easier . Gravity still effects the ISS so every now and again the shuttle has to correct its orbit (and avoid space debris sometimes)

    The shuttle is in Low Earth Orbit (LEO)

    Info here ; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Space_S...

    Video here ; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8rHarp1GEE

    Youtube thumbnail

    Edit . Sorry for the broken links ive fixed them now .

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What is the ISS used for?

    I was wondering about the International Space Station. like what is it made of, what is it used for, how did they piece it together, and how long will it be in orbit, and finally what orbit is it in like the GEO, MEO?

    Source(s): iss for: https://tr.im/IN6Rr
  • 9 years ago

    The space station is also a science lab. Many countries worked together to build it. They also work together to use it.

    The space station is made of many pieces. The pieces were put together in space by astronauts. The space station's orbit is about 220 miles above Earth. NASA uses the station to learn about living and working in space. These lessons will help NASA explore space.

    The space station has many parts. The parts are called modules. The first modules had parts needed to make the space station work. Astronauts also lived in those modules. Modules called “nodes” connect parts of the station to each other. Labs on the space station let astronauts do research.

    On the sides of the space station are solar arrays. These arrays collect energy from the sun. They turn sunlight into electricity. Robot arms are attached outside. The robot arms helped to build the space station. They also can move astronauts around outside and control science experiments.

    Airlocks on the space station are like doors. Astronauts use them to go outside on spacewalks.

    Astronauts work in spacesuits to help build the space station.

    Docking ports are like doors, too. The ports allow visiting spacecraft to connect to the space station. New crews and visitors enter the station through the docking ports. Astronauts fly to the space station on the Russian Soyuz. The crew members use the ports to move supplies onto the station.

    Like all other spacecraft, it has heavy-duty radiation shielding and is built mainly from aluminum. It has food, waste, oxygen scrubbers, among the above things.

    also see:

    http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/ind...

  • Janet
    Lv 4
    5 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/avidM

    to study long duration space flight and effect on the body.. mostly research

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  • 5 years ago

    Its used to shuttle politicians when the world hits the nuclear destroy button. Its a hiding place.

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