How long should I wait to take painkillers after drinking alcohol?

I went out for a few drinks for a friend's birthday, I only had two. I'm on 50mg Tramadol.

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  • 9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Effects of Painkillers and Alcohol

    The effects of mixing alcohol and painkillers are variable for every painkiller and are also affected by the amount of alcohol that has been consumed by the patient. The reason that painkillers and alcohol should not be taken at the same time is that both the substances are depressants, i.e., they affect the nervous system. The double effect of both the substances is not very healthy for the human nervous system and respiratory system. The respiratory system and the nervous system, due to the effects of both depressants, get relaxed and eventually slow down. The rate of breathing reduces, thus decreasing the volume of essential oxygen in the body. The second effect is that these substances also tend to affect the digestive system, especially the liver.

    The following are some of the symptoms that can be observed when alcohol and some of the commonly used painkillers are consumed together.

    Anticonvulsant: The anticonvulsants are basically the painkillers that are often used as mood stabilizers as they calm down the nervous system and the neurons. The anticonvulsants are used to treat seizures. However, if the anticonvulsant as a painkiller and alcohol are consumed together, then the person faces a strong possibility of suffering from a seizure. The instant symptoms that are easily noticeable are a genuine feeling of drowsiness that can become severe and also the feeling of lightheartedness.

    Opioids: Opioids as painkillers and alcohol are an extremely lethal combination. The mixture causes severe dizziness and breathing problems that can lead to cardiac arrests if medical attention is not receive on time.

    Over the Counter Drugs: As mentioned in the above, over the counter painkillers are not exactly dangerous for the human body. Apart from the short term risks like slowed down breathing, there are many different long term side effects such as developing ulcers and extensive liver damage.

    Anti Depressants: The anti depressants which are also a part of the painkillers, pose a threat to the human body as well. One of worst effects of the combination of the two is suicidal thoughts and there is also very strong risk of over dose.

    It can be concluded that it is pretty risky to consume alcohol along with painkillers. There is also a strong possibility of alcoholism, affecting other medications. Even if both the substances are consumed together, without any negative after effects, there is always a long term damage that has been inflicted upon the human body.

    So based on above i would wait for alcohol to be out of my system before i took a pain killer

  • 9 years ago

    The alcohol should be outta your system in a couple hours. I would wait until you are completely sober to take any form of painkiller. Painkillers+alcohol = bad things.

  • Judith
    Lv 4
    5 years ago

    I'm not a merdic,but I'll suggest that u refrain from taking alcohol till ur condition is normal,since alcohol and medication do not mix.u could damage ur lever.The best remedy would be' either do not take the painkiller and suffer the pain or take the painkiller and be a teetotaller for the new year eve'.

  • 9 years ago

    You should wait 24 hours before using Tramadol.Be aware that Tramadol and alcohol is a deadly combination

    +1 star for q,useful for others

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  • 9 years ago

    Tramadol is not that strong, however you still shouldn't take it if you are going to be drinking with it at all. Different people's bodies react different to medication especially when mixed with alcohol.

  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    24hours

  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Tramadol dosing information

    Usual Adult Dose for Pain:

    Immediate-release: 50 to 100 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed for painMaximum dose: 400 mg per day Comments: -Dose should be individualized; for patients not requiring rapid onset of analgesic effect, the tolerability may be increased by initiating at the lowest possible dose and titrating upward.Use: For the management of moderate to moderately severe pain.

    Usual Adult Dose for Chronic Pain:

    For patients with moderate to moderately severe chronic pain not requiring rapid onset of analgesic effect, tolerability can be improved by initiating slowlyImmediate-Release: -Initial dose: 25 mg orally once a day; titrate in 25 mg increments every 3 days to reach a dose of 25 mg four times a day; thereafter increase by 50 mg as tolerated every 3 days to reach a dose of 50 mg four times a day-Maintenance dose: After titration, 50 to 100 mg orally as needed for pain every 4 to 6 hours-Maximum dose: 400 mg per dayExtended-Release: -Initial dose (tramadol-naive): 100 mg orally once a day; titrate upwards in 100 mg increments every 5 days as needed and as tolerated. -Maximum Dose: 300 mg orally per day-Initial Dose for patients CURRENTLY receiving immediate-release tramadol: Calculate the 24-hour immediate-release requirement and initiate with a total daily dose rounded down to the next lowest 100 mg increment given orally once a day-Individualize dose as needed and as tolerated -Maximum Dose: 300 mg per dayComments: -Due to limitations of dose selection with extended-release formulations, some patients may not be able to convert from the immediate-release to the extended-release.-The extended-release products should not be used with other tramadol products and should not be taken more often than once a day. Use: For the management of moderate to moderately severe chronic pain in adults who require around-the-clock treatment of their pain for an extended period of time.

    Usual Geriatric Dose for Pain:

    Immediate-Release: -65 years or older: Start at the low end of the dosing range-75 years or older: Maximum dose: 300 mg per day in divided dosesComments:-Dose should be individualized; initiating at the lowest possible dose and titrating upward may result in increased tolerability and fewer drug discontinuations Use: For the management of moderate to moderately severe pain.

    Usual Geriatric Dose for Chronic Pain:

    Immediate-Release: -Age 65 years or older: Start at the low end of the dosing range-Age 75 years or older: Maximum dose is 300 mg per dayExtended-release: -Age 65 years or older: Use caution; start at the low end of the dosing range-Age 75 years or older: Use even greater cautionComments: -Due to limitations of dose selection with extended-release formulations, some patients may not be able to convert from the immediate-release to the extended-release.-The extended-release product should not be used with other tramadol products and should not be taken more often than once daily. Use: For the management of moderate to moderately severe chronic pain in adults who require around-the-clock treatment of their pain for an extended period of time.

    Usual Pediatric Dose for Pain:

    17 years or older: Immediate-release: 50 to 100 mg orally every 4 to 6 hours as needed for painMaximum dose: 400 mg per dayFor patients with moderate to moderately severe chronic pain not requiring rapid onset of analgesic effect, tolerability can be improved by initiating slowly:Immediate-Release: -Initial dose: 25 mg orally once daily; titrate in 25 mg increments every 3 days to reach a dose of 25 mg four times a day; thereafter increase by 50 mg as tolerated every 3 days to reach a dose of 50 mg four times a day-Maintenance dose: After titration, 50 to 100 mg orally as needed for pain every 4 to 6 hours-Maximum dose: 400 mg per day Comments: -Dose should be individualized; starting at the lowest possible dose and titrating upward may result in increased tolerability and fewer drug discontinuations. Use: For the management of moderate to moderately severe pain.

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