How do illegal Mexicans here & suppoters feel about Mexico Case Reveals Vast Human Trafficking Scheme?

The case of a Mexican organization which allegedly paid mothers to put their children up for adoption has highlighted the fine line between adoption and child trafficking, and suggests that the practice is widespread in the country. A child trafficking ring uncovered by Mexican police in mid-January in... show more The case of a Mexican organization which allegedly paid mothers to put their children up for adoption has highlighted the fine line between adoption and child trafficking, and suggests that the practice is widespread in the country.

A child trafficking ring uncovered by Mexican police in mid-January in Guadalajara, Jalisco has not only operated since the 1980′s, a decade earlier than previously reported, but has also provided hundreds of children to adoptive families in other countries. The story began unraveling on January 9, 2012, after 21-year-old Laura Talamantes Fabiola Carranza was detained by police in Guadalajara. She was accused of allegedly trying to sell her two-year-old son.

This led to the arrest of nine other people who were said to be participating in the same baby trafficking ring. Associated Press writer Olga Rodríguez followed the story closely, reporting on how seven of the children’s mothers said they believed they had been allowing their children to be photographed for anti-abortion advertising campaigns. Some of the babies had no birth certificates, Rodríguez reported, and at least one of the mothers was functionally illiterate. Other news reports allege that some birth mothers were paid $188 per week to carry their pregancies to term and then relinquish their children for adoption.

After these particular children had been fraudulently separated from their mothers, they were subsequently offered as adoptable orphans to Irish families. The Irish Times, the Irish Examiner, and other publications covered the story extensively, noting that 18 cases of Mexican-Irish adoption are currently under investigation, and that approximately sixty Mexican children have been adopted to Ireland since 2004. Lawyer Carlos Montoya, speaking on behalf of the Irish families ensnared in the scandal, told the Examiner that there were no suspicions of wrongdoing on the part of the adoptive families.

Guadalajara-based attorney Carlos Lopez Valenzuela is one of the people allegedly at the center of the operation. His law firm, Lopez & Lopez Associates, was operated by both Lopez and his son, reported by the Mexican press to be a former state prosecutor. The firm, according to posts signed by Lopez on internet adoption websites and message boards, was “exclusively devoted” to private Mexican adoptions and boasted of “an outstanding track record in delivering healthy children.” One of his posts, dated August 2001, claims he “handled over 260 adoptions for Couples of New York area during the past 21 years [sic],” or since 1981.

A History of Child-Buying and Trafficking Allegations
This is not the first time Lopez has been involved in an adoption scandal. In 2003, Lesley Stahl and the CBS TV news magazine 48 Hours produced a story called “Twist of Fate,” which followed two Mexican sisters who had been adopted to different American families. The adoption had been arranged by Carlos Lopez. The girls’ birth mother claimed she had been “forced to give them up for adoption,” alleging that Lopez had refused to return her daughters after she changed her mind. Additionally, she said, records for her daughters had been manufactured. Lopez said he’d done nothing wrong.

In 1990, Belen Zapata of CNN Mexico recently reported, Lopez and three other women were detained on charges of human trafficking stemming from attempts to purchase as-yet unborn children from pregnant women at the Hospital Civil de Guadalajara. At the time, Lopez told authorities he was a representative of the Association of Adoptive Parents of New York.
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