Anonymous
Anonymous asked in SportsCycling · 8 years ago

Can i ride a mountain bike on the road?

i want to get a trek fuel ex 9.8 as my first bike and im new to all this but i heard mountain bikes arent good on road. can i such add slicks and things will be good? when i first discovered the fuel ex i fell in love with it and already have 3200$ in saving for it. i want to ride off road with it thats why im buying it but i dont want a second bike for the road thats lame. also if i do ride it on the rode will it damage my bike?

Update:

what are the pros and cons, im new to this and i have no idea what your talking about

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  • fgr_cl
    Lv 4
    8 years ago
    Best Answer

    In short, yes, you can. Nothing bad will happen to it other than tire wear.

    You may go a bit slower than people on road bikes, but unless you go downhill on a smooth and straight road, physical condition is much more important than bike. I mean, if you train a lot, you may go faster than many people riding road bikes.

    You can put slicks to close the gap against road bikes. There are two ways of doing that.

    The first way is to change tires (and tubes) every time you need. You remove the knobby tires (and their tubes) and put slicks (and road tubes) when you will start using it on the road, e. g. for commuting, and do the opposite for offroading. This is the cheapest and least space-consuming option, but it is very time consuming. And you will not be able to have tubeless tires.

    The second way is to buy a second wheelset and use it only for slicks. It may be another mountainbike wheelset - it doesn't have to be very fancy, a special road wheelset for mountainbikes (such as Mavic Speedcity), or a custom-built wheelset, with 700C road rims and disc hubs. Either way, you may put a road cassette for increased preformance. Just make sure the number of speeds match. This is the fastest, easiest and best performing option, but it will be more expensive.

    BTW, 700C road tires do fit into 26" mountain bikes. they have roughly the same outer diameter.

    Good luck.

  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    Can i ride a mountain bike on the road?

    i want to get a trek fuel ex 9.8 as my first bike and im new to all this but i heard mountain bikes arent good on road.

    ==they are just slower

    can i such add slicks and things will be good?

    ==yes

    still be slower than a $700 road bike though

    when i first discovered the fuel ex i fell in love with it and already have 3200$ in saving for it.

    ==you could get 2 really good road bikes for that

    i want to ride off road with it thats why im buying it but i dont want a second bike for the road thats lame.

    ==lame is being slow

    also if i do ride it on the rode will it damage my bike?

    ==is this a joke? no

    this whole post seems suspiciously d*mb

    8 hours ago

    - 4 days left to answer.

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    Additional Details

    what are the pros and cons, im new to this and i have no idea what your talking about

    ==pros - none reallly, you will be riding a bike you like, i guess

    cons

    --slow

    you will look kind of silly being passed by old grannies on 1980s 10 speeds on your $3200 bike

    but hey

    ==just saying, you are spending a ton on something

    ..and apparently don;t even want to take use it for what it is [so expensively] made for

    ==i mean fine if road use is like 5% of the time

    wle

  • DS
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    Wow. Ok buddy. Here's some good advice. The trek fuel is a beast of a mountain bike, well worth its massive price tag; if you plan on riding how its designed to be ridden. You can ride it on the road, you can put slicks/street tires on it, but then you're defeating the purpose of blowing 3k on that bike. If you put slicks on it, are you really going to change them back to mountain bike tires every time you want to go offroad? Think about that. Thats alot of extra work unless you want to go out and buy a 2nd wheelset.

    There is nothing wrong with riding a mountain bike on the road. its just less efficient. How on earth could it damage the bike? What is on the road that could possibly be more hazardous than what you come across mountain biking? The only thing it will do is wear the treads of your mountain specific tires down faster.

    Honestly, why would you drop 3k on your first bike? You're abilities aren't even going to use 1/10th of what that bike is designed for. Are you going to be bombing down ski resorts, hucking it off jumps and drops, and otherwise hauling butt down the side of a mountain? You could get a much cheaper mountain bike and it would still serve you well for years while you improve your abilities to the level a bike like this is designed to be ridden at. But if you want to be one of "those guys" riding their $3000 dollar bike somewhere where I could take a $300 bike with a little kid in a child seat on the back, then so be it.

    You can also buy a cheap 250-350 mountain or hybrid bike to use on the road. My advice would be to get a slightly cheaper FS bike and use ~300 of what you saved to buy an entry level hybrid bike for use on the road. More bikes are better. Different styles are designed for different purposes.

    Whats so "uncool" about having more bikes?

    The optimum number of bikes to own is always the current number your have plus one. If I had things my way I would have a 29er XC full suspension, a sweet all mountain full suspension, a super light hardtail, and a road bike. After that I would consider a fixie and a cruiser just for special situations.

  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    I have a Trail 5 that I use on the road with Geax Roadsters, can keep up with my road bike friends ok in non training rides. Takes about ten minutes to swap tires, but two sets are easier. The stock oem rims are skinny, great for the road, not strong enough for serious trails, so I am building up some proper wheels for trails.

    I don't lockout the front, set on high damp with max spring tension, it doesn't move at all on the streets except when transitioning surfaces or bumps. Takes the jolts out of the handlebar, feel no difference in efficiency.

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  • BigE
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    I ride my full suspension MTB on the road all the time, mostly to get to the dirt. I've done this pretty much as long as I've been riding MTB (about 25 years). The only thing it hurts is that you wear the nubs off your offroad tires more quickly. Road is very abrasive to off road tires.

    Of course you are slower, but who cares? It is a mode of transport. You only notice when

    your friends are on road bikes.

    The other con is that compared to road bikes, your road handling can be compromised. I have never done it, but I have ridden with several friends on the road that get a little too confident on their MTB, hit a bit

    of sand on a fast turn and lie the bike down. Of course it can happen on a road bike also, but I don't know if it is inexperience or the tires that make it happen. I am guessing they are used to a road bike, and not a MTB on the road.

    If I have a long period of non-dirt, I change to slicks. The ride (rolling resistance) is improved.

  • 8 years ago

    Local

    Yes you can. It is just the weight and suspension systems which make it heavier and inefficient compared to a road bike. Figure a mountain bike will be 30% less efficient on the road. This translates to slower speed and at a cost of more energy for the rider. BUT this means a much harder workout...l so you will be in better shape,if you can keep up with your road bike partners.

    Soccerref

  • 8 years ago

    Yes...you can ride it on the streets. The bike has a "lockout" front suspension fork. When on the streets, use this feature. In essence, you are turning the suspension front fork into a rigid front fork. Suspension is NOT needed on the streets.

    However...due to the knobby tires, disc brakes (which weigh the bike down) and more suspension parts - you'll be really s-l-o-w compared to other bikes on the street. You can install a set of semi-slick tread tires for a little more speed - but will lose the all-terrain ability.

    Ask yourself this question..."Where & How" will I be riding? Is this Trek bicycle the one you NEED or the one you want? See 2nd link below from R.E.I. - How to Choose a Bicycle.

  • 3 years ago

    Trek 3200 Mountain Bike

  • droid
    Lv 5
    8 years ago

    uh huh... you want a made in usa super high end mountain bike for the road. And you don't want a road bike because it would be lame. I can't comprehend your logic.

    Cons - You'll be slow as hell on the road.

    Pros - you'll have one badass bike.

  • John M
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    The best bike for the road will be a road bike

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