Is it best to make a dark roux when making a gumbo?

Firsttime I made a gumbo i burned the roux a little bit but served it anyway and everone loved it, I would say that was quiet a dark roux, if you could call it that, second time i made a light roux and it was delicious! but i would like to know from someone who knows about gumbo, which provides the best flavor?

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  • KDL
    Lv 6
    8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    I like it darker but I don't burn it lol. The darker has richer, nuttier flavor. Lighter tastes fine once you get all your ingredients in, but I prefer darker without question.

    The color of the roux has no effect on the thickness, and you're not making gravy. For thickening I use okra, and I have never been able to abide with the flavor of that sassafras file powder.

    Source(s): Cooking gumbo since well before the turn of the century (not saying how many years lol).
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  • 8 years ago

    From what I've seen, you want to make a very dark roux called a brick roux. It's just one step away from burned and has almost a dark brick red color. Just realize that the darker a roux gets, the less thickening power it has.

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  • 8 years ago

    A recipe I read once said that the roux had to be the color of a dark penny, not a shiny new one. I can still remember the pic showing the penny v. the roux.

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  • John
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    Sorry I don't remember the name or the show, but there's a TV chef from, and sponsored by, the Louisiana Tourist Bureau. He does a lot of game and a lot of food-tourism sort of spots. Just last week he said, "If your roux isn't dark it's not gonna be cajun food." Keeping in mind that nothing should ever be burned.

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  • 8 years ago

    Light is best

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