WHY was an English-based myth (King Arthur) important to a horde of invading Frenchmen and their descendants?

Geoffrey of Monmouth wrote a history of King Arthur (circa 1136-1139) that mainly benefited the Norman conquerors of Britannia: William and his heirs. Explain to an average reader why Geoffrey took this approach. In other words, WHY was an English-based myth (King Arthur) important to a horde of invading Frenchmen and their descendants?

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  • 9 years ago
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    "The end of the Middle Ages brought with it a waning of interest in King Arthur. Although Malory's English version of the great French romances was popular, there were increasing attacks upon the truthfulness of the historical framework of the Arthurian romances—established since Geoffrey of Monmouth's time—and thus the legitimacy of the whole Matter of Britain. So, for example, the 16th-century humanist scholar Polydore Vergil famously rejected the claim that Arthur was the ruler of a post-Roman empire, found throughout the post-Galfridian medieval "chronicle tradition", to the horror of Welsh and English antiquarians"

    Geoffrey of Monmouth showed the Roman influence of the myth and the Normans were also decendents of the Romans.

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