If a Catholic employer can deny contraception benefits, could a Jehovah's Witness deny blood transfusions?

A lot of flap has been stirred up this week by Obama's mandate that employers must provide contraceptive services as part of their health care coverage. Catholics, and others, say this is an unconstitutional government invasion of the free exercise of religious beliefs. So we buy into this argument, we must... show more A lot of flap has been stirred up this week by Obama's mandate that employers must provide contraceptive services as part of their health care coverage. Catholics, and others, say this is an unconstitutional government invasion of the free exercise of religious beliefs. So we buy into this argument, we must then concede the point that a Jehovah's Witness owned business could deny benefits for blood transfusions. Or that any other religious organization could deny a health care benefit just because it went against their religious beliefs.
Update: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion": Unfortunately, no one but the courts seem to be interested in defending that part of the first Amendment. Just this past November, Congress reaffirmed, "In God We Trust" as the nation's motto. However, "...or... show more "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion": Unfortunately, no one but the courts seem to be interested in defending that part of the first Amendment. Just this past November, Congress reaffirmed, "In God We Trust" as the nation's motto.

However, "...or prohibiting the free exercise thereof" seems to be sacrosanct. This is the real problem I have with this idea. Either all of the Constitution deserves protection, or none of it deserves protection.
Update 2: @Dr. Phil: I disagree with you. There is a difference between an individual in government having their own personal beliefs, and a government body making a religious statement as a government body. By reaffirming "In God We Trust", Congress essentially made Christianity the de facto religion of the United... show more @Dr. Phil: I disagree with you. There is a difference between an individual in government having their own personal beliefs, and a government body making a religious statement as a government body. By reaffirming "In God We Trust", Congress essentially made Christianity the de facto religion of the United States. While we could sit here and argue that "God" in this context does not necessarily mean the Christian idea of god, I don't think anyone would reasonably assume that any member who voted for the resolution had anything else in mind. Furthermore, the organizations which originally campaigned to have "In God We Trust" included - and "under God" added to the Pledge, were primarily Christian organizations - The Knights of Columbus to name one.
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