if a sun burns hydrogen?

does that mean there is no actual flames (needs air) its just a plasma type flame? And where does the hydrogen come from because you cant just create a element just change one to another by useing differant variables.

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  • 8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    The sun is plasma interwoven with magnetic fields, so it is indeed plasma and not flames of fire, it is also 74% hydrogen and 24% helium the rest is iron, nickel, oxygen, silicon, sulfur, magnesium, carbon, neon, calcium, chromium and 1% oxygen.

    The hydrogen and helium came from the big bang in the very early moments of the universe, hydrogen formed from elementary particles. The pressure and temperatures were still so intense that the entire Universe had the same conditions as the core of a star.

    Hydrogen was fused into helium until the Universe cooled down enough that this reaction couldn’t happen any more. The ratios of hydrogen and helium that we see in the universe today were created in those first few moments after the Big Bang.

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  • 8 years ago

    The sun, like the universe as a whole, is mainly hydrogen, and that hydrogen was created in the seconds after the big bang, along with helium and a very little lithium. All other elements have been made within stars by the same process the sun uses, namely nuclear fusion. In the first instance, that fusion creates helium by fussing hydrogen. Other elements are made in stars in much the same way, except that the heaviest elements (everything beyond iron in the periodic table) were created in supernova explosions.

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  • 8 years ago

    After the Big Bang (or whatever you want to call the Beginning) almost everything physical was hydrogen and helium. Stars then formed, lived and died. When these stars went Nova or Supernova, THIS is what created everything else!!! Every element heavier than Iron is formed in the Blast of a Nova or Supernova. A star's thermonuclear reaction can form elements up to Iron, but when a star starts forming Iron in its nuclear reaction, its not too long until its fuel runs out. When this happens, the star explodes, during this massive explosion, massive amounts of heavier elements are created when heavier atoms are slammed together to form Carbon, Gold, Platinum, Iridium, and the heavier elements.

    In other words, if your made of Carbon (and you and all other known life is), then you really are "star stuff" because THAT CARBON was formed in the death of a star.

    Our own sun is a 3rd Generation Star. So, the nebula it formed from had the heavier elements from the lives of the previous 2 stars.

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  • Paul
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    The Hydrogen was created from the initial event that created the universe, the Hydrogen in stars coalesced from the nebulae in what's known as a stellar nursary.

    When stars go supernova they don't go supernova because they have used up all their hydrogen, they go supernova when there is not enough hydrogen left to sustain thermonuclear reactions in the core because enough helium and other heavier elemets have been created and sunk to the core and fused until iron is fused in the core making the star unstable and explodes. There is still lots of hydrogen left for smaller stars to form.

    Hope this helps.

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  • 8 years ago

    There are no flames, plasma is super heated gas

    stars are born in nebulae which are clouds of various gases (mostly hydrogen) and other material the hydrogen is gathered up from the nebulae and compressed into a sphere until hydrogen atoms cannot avoid smashing into each other, when they do they fuse to create helium releasing enormous amounts of energy.

    the energy released in the fusion process comes in the form of light and heat, the heat pushes the stars mass outward and gravity is trying to compress inward this is why stars are stable.

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  • Jimbob
    Lv 5
    8 years ago

    The sun doesn't actually 'burn' hydrogen. Burning is a chemical reaction that does require oxygen. The sun is a thermonuclear reaction. No oxygen required. In the sun's core two hydrogen atoms fuse together to form one helium atom. The nuclear fusion reaction generates an enormous amount of light and heat. The hydrogen in the sun came from the spinning disk of material that the sun and the planets formed from. The planet Jupiter is also mostly hydrogen, but it is not massive enough to trigger a fusion reaction.

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  • Gary B
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    The sun doesn't BURN. it is a Nuclear Reactor which stses hydrogen for fuel. This is called the Hyrogen Burn Cycle, and is almoa completely self sustaining.

    Suns form becasue of teh hydrogen that exists. When teh amount of hydrogen becomes sufficient, the gravitry causes the hydrogen to FUSE, and thus the nuclear reaction is started.

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  • Mark
    Lv 6
    8 years ago

    Burning in this process isn't oxidization rather its fusion. In a three step chain reaction, four hydrogen atoms become a single helium atom, releasing quite a bit of energy.

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  • Yes, it is a plasma type "fire". The gas is not burning (as in combustion) but IS still very hot.

    The universe's hydrogen was created in aftermath of the Big Bang when the temperature of the universe was sufficiently cool for simple atoms (hydrogen IS the simplest, being composed of one proton and one electron) to condense out of the primordial soup of free moving subatomic particles.

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  • 8 years ago

    Depends what you mean by 'burn' - it is using Hydrogen as fuel, but not in combustion. The process is nuclear fusion.

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