Was Pope John Paul I poisoned?

Yet another book has been written on the suspicious death of Pope John Paul I, this time by a Spanish priest named Father Jesus Lopez Saez. Building upon the work of David Yallop, Father Saez writes: After almost three years of research, David Yallop wrote, in his book In God's Name (1984), that the precise... show more Yet another book has been written on the suspicious death of Pope John Paul I, this time by a Spanish priest named Father Jesus Lopez Saez. Building upon the work of David Yallop, Father Saez writes:

After almost three years of research, David Yallop wrote, in his book In God's Name (1984), that the precise circumstances attending the discovery of the body of John Paul I "eloquently demonstrate that the Vatican practiced a disinformation campaign." The Vatican told one lie after another: "Lies about little things, lies about big things. All these lies had but one purpose: to disguise the fact that Albino Luciani, Pope John Paul I, had been assassinated." Pope Luciani "received the palm of martyrdom because of his convictions."
Update: Sister Vicenza found the Holy Father dead at approximately 4:45 a.m. on September 29, 1978 and was forced to keep silent by the Secretariat of State, Cardinal Villot, who imposed a vow of silence upon her to cover-up the whole affair. The secretaries were likewise forbidden to advise anyone of the events without... show more Sister Vicenza found the Holy Father dead at approximately 4:45 a.m. on September 29, 1978 and was forced to keep silent by the Secretariat of State, Cardinal Villot, who imposed a vow of silence upon her to cover-up the whole affair. The secretaries were likewise forbidden to advise anyone of the events without Cardinal Villot's authorization. A trustworthy person conveyed to Fr. Saez personally that Sister Vicenza had said, "But the world must know the truth."
Sister Vicenza gave two conflicting reports concerning the state that she first found Pope John Paul I. According to her breathless words to a group of French priests that same morning, it was "in his bathroom" that she had "found him dead." Yet another report (no doubt arranged by Cardinal Villot), says that Sister Vicenza entered the room and found the Pope sitting up in bed, "with an expression of agony" before he died. This discrepancy is very important: if it was determin
Update 2: Fr. Saez notes in his book that the amount of evidence is such that "no judge on earth could disregard it." He also notes that "the data and the evidence that we already possess would justify a serious judicial enquiry in any law-respecting state. Now, not only does the Vatican refuse to conduct... show more Fr. Saez notes in his book that the amount of evidence is such that "no judge on earth could disregard it." He also notes that

"the data and the evidence that we already possess would justify a serious judicial enquiry in any law-respecting state. Now, not only does the Vatican refuse to conduct such an enquiry, but it does exactly the opposite: it thwarts and suppresses any research that tries to get to the bottom of this enigma surrounding John Paul I's death. This state of affairs is manifest in the Vatican's refusal to carry out an autopsy (if in fact one was not carried out) or in the clandestine nature of this operation (if it did actually take place). It also reveals itself in the obscurity surrounding the embalming, in the way that information regarding the circumstances of the death and the discovery of the body was manipulated, in the silence imposed on Sister Vicenza, in the pressure brought to bear on individuals and institutions, and in the widespre
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