Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentPolitics · 9 years ago

Cons, how do you refute this study that shows that liberal arts majors are more likely to be employed?

Liberal arts education lends an edge in down economy

By Mary Beth Marklein, USA TODAY

Updated 1d 21h ago

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A liberal arts education can provide a leg up in a down economy, a survey suggests.

Prav Chatani studies at St. Lawrence University in Canton, N.Y., a small liberal arts college. A new study shows students with skills most associated with a liberal arts education were more likely to be better off after college.

2007 photo by Christopher Lenney, AP

Prav Chatani studies at St. Lawrence University in Canton, N.Y., a small liberal arts college. A new study shows students with skills most associated with a liberal arts education were more likely to be better off after college.

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2007 photo by Christopher Lenney, AP

Prav Chatani studies at St. Lawrence University in Canton, N.Y., a small liberal arts college. A new study shows students with skills most associated with a liberal arts education were more likely to be better off after college.

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Recent college graduates who as seniors scored highest on a standardized test to measure how well they think, reason and write — skills most associated with a liberal arts education — were far more likely to be better off financially than those who scored lowest, says the survey, released Wednesday by the Social Science Research Council, an independent organization.

It found that students who had mastered the ability to think critically, reason analytically and write effectively by their senior year were:

•Three times less likely to be unemployed than those who hadn't (3.1% vs. 9.6%).

Recent graduates

A survey of 925 young adults who graduated college during the economic recession, offers a snapshot of how they were faring two years later:

74% were receiving financial help from parents

65% had student loans, owing an average $27,200

46% owed an average $1,880 on credit-card debt

22% had "moved back home" with their parents or relatives

9% had student loan debt averaging more than $50,00

Source: Social Science Research Council

•Half as likely to be living with their parents (18% vs. 35%).

•Far less likely to have amassed credit card debt (37% vs. 51%).

Grades and other factors influence a student's chances of success, too. Graduates of colleges with tougher admissions standards tended to have fewer debts and were less likely to live with their parents, the study found.

A report this month by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, which studies the labor-market value of college degrees, found that recent graduates with a bachelor's degree in architecture had the highest average jobless rate (13.9%, vs. 8.9% for all recent college graduates). Education and health care majors had some of the lowest jobless rates.

The findings released Wednesday "show something new and different," says lead author Richard Arum, a New York University professor. "Students would do well to appreciate the extent to which their development of general skills, not just majors and institution attended, is related to successful adult transitions."

The study is based on surveys of 925 graduates who as college seniors had taken the Collegiate Learning Assessment, a standardized test that aims to measure student learning. In addition to showing greater success financially, high-scorers were more likely to read the news and discuss politics and be living with or married to a romantic partner they met in college.

Richard Ekman, president of the Council of Independent Colleges, an association that encourages its member schools to assess student learning, says findings suggest that the Collegiate Learning Assessment is "a pretty good measure of how people are going to do in life."

Arum also cautions that the study doesn't speak to whether high-scoring graduates picked up their skills while in college. It follows up on research last year showing that 36% of college graduates showed few or no gains in learning between their freshman and senior years.

"While their outcomes are not a product solely of their college experience … it's important for colleges to figure out a way to be more effective," he says.

Update:

You cons are always talking about how liberal arts majors are worthless. Well, I just came across this article that refutes that.

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  • 9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Liberal Arts doesn't mean "Left-wing Arts". Nearly everything on the US political spectrum falls under a political philosophy called "Classical Liberalism". It refers to a belief in individual liberty, capitalism, constitutions, etc. It was liberal for the time because "Conservative" referred to monarchies. Within the US political system, "Conservative" means "Classical Liberal" and "Liberal" means "Classical Liberal, bordering on Democratic Socialism, but not quite there yet".

  • Zaza
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    It's pretty common knowledge that people with college degrees fare better than those that don't have a college degree.

    You are not suggesting that the "Liberal" in Liberals Arts means something significant to Liberals, are you?

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Wow. You only have examples of democratic felons. There are equal amounts of republican felons as well. Exhibit A: Enron. And if you seriously believe Trent Lott (if it is this Lott in the article) is a good mentor on ethics, then you seriously need to check yourself. Ethics knows no party system. Sounds like your a smug republican who thinks he knows the world too well and thinks that FOXNews is correct in creating correct television instead of delivering correct journalism.

  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    If you have $30,000 worth of debt your f8cked. When interest rates rise, and the few americans that have a job left (not liberal arts majors) are around. How the hell are you going to pay a $30,000 loan at 30% interest?

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  • Jeff
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    Throw out the ones who have cushy government jobs and the numbers don't look quite as rosy.

  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    "in down economy" as stated in your link? I can't nor do I care.

    Prostitution rises in a down economy also.

  • 9 years ago

    This study shows that people with college do better economically than those who don't. Eureeka!!!!! You are a ******* genius!!!

  • 9 years ago

    why should I.....?

    ...you're the one with the desperate need to use the education of others to make yourself feel better about yourself...

    Source(s): BA in "Liberal Arts"....employed ever since....
  • 9 years ago

    liberal arts does not mean what you think it means

  • meg
    Lv 6
    9 years ago

    You don't have to be 'smart' to be employed by the government.

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