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Anonymous asked in Social ScienceEconomics · 8 years ago

Explain how perceptions and characteristics of geographic regions in the United States have changed over time?

Explain how perceptions and characteristics of geographic regions in the United States have changed over time regarding: Wilderness and Conservation

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  • 8 years ago
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    Geographical Regions in the United States

    Many Americans consider their country a geographic whole consisting of large regions shaped by history, geography, economics, dialects and even literature. The U.S. Census Bureau divides the United States into four main regions, all of which have subdivisions comprised of states belonging to the region as a whole.

    Northeast

    The Northeast has two divisions. Division 1 encompasses the region known as New England. New England is comprised of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut. Division 2, known as the Mid-Atlantic, consists of New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

    Midwest

    The Midwest also has two divisions. East North Central is considered Division 3; it consists of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. West North Central, or Division 4, incorporates the states of Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Minnesota and Iowa.

    South

    The South is sectioned into three divisions. The South Atlantic, known as Division 5, is comprised of Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. East South Central/Division 6 incorporates Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi and Alabama. West South Central, or Division 7, consists of Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas and Louisiana.

    West

    The West is a geographic region that includes Mountain, or Division 8, and Pacific, also known as Division 9. The Mountain division consists of Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico. The Pacific division consists of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California and Hawaii.

    American Old West

    The American Old West, or the Wild West, comprises the history, geography, people, folklore, and cultural expression of life in the Western United States, most often referring to the latter half of the 19th century, between the California Gold Rush of 1849 and the end of the century. After the 18th century and the push beyond the Appalachian Mountains, the term is generally applied to anywhere west of the Mississippi River in earlier periods and westward from the frontier strip toward the later part of the 19th century. Thus, the Midwest and American South, though not considered part of the Western United States today, have Western heritage along with the modern western states. More broadly, the period stretches from the early 19th century to the end of the Mexican Revolution in 1920.

    Through treaties with foreign nations and native peoples, political compromise, technological innovation, military conquest, establishment of law and order, and the great migrations of foreigners, the United States expanded from coast to coast (Atlantic Ocean to Pacific Ocean), fulfilling advocates' belief in Manifest Destiny. In securing and managing the West, the U.S. federal government greatly expanded its powers, as the nation evolved from an agrarian society to an industrialised nation. First promoting settlement and exploitation of the land, by the end of the 19th century the federal government assumed stewardship of the remaining open spaces. As the American Old West passed into history, the myths of the West took firm hold in the imagination of Americans and foreigners alike.

    The American frontier moved gradually westward decades after the settlement of the first immigrants on the Eastern seaboard in the 17th century. The "West" was always the area beyond that boundary. Scholars, however, sometimes refer to the Old West as the region of the Ohio and Tennessee valleys during the 18th century, when the frontier was being contested by Britain, France, and the American colonies. Most often, however, the "American Old West," the "Old West," or "the Great West" is used to describe the area west of the Mississippi River during the 19th century.

    The federal government established a sequence of actions related to control over western lands. First, it acquired western territory from other nations or native tribes by treaty, then it sent surveyors and explorers to map and document the land, next it ordered federal troops to clear out and subdue the resisting natives, and finally, it had bureaucracies manage the land, such as the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Land Office, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the Forest Service. The process was not a smooth one. Indian resistance, sectionalism, and racism forced some pauses in the process of westward settlement. Nonetheless, by the end of the 19th century, in the process of conquering and managing the West, the federal government amassed great size, power, and influence in national affairs.

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  • 3 years ago

    The Northeast has two divisions. Division 1 encompasses the region known as New England. New England is comprised of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut. Division 2, known as the Mid-Atlantic, consists of New York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

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