If momentum is possible without conventional mass, is momentum possible without conventional velocity?

In other words, does the conventional equation for momentum require only one of its two elements? We already know that conventionally the equation is Momentum = Mass * Velocity It took some work, but an answerer agreed with me at:... show more In other words, does the conventional equation for momentum require only one of its two elements?

We already know that conventionally the equation is Momentum = Mass * Velocity

It took some work, but an answerer agreed with me at: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;...

We also know that photons don't conventionally have mass:

Consider the previous answer at:
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;...

If the equation can be fulfilled in one way, then logically it could be fulfilled in another way,

For example, an object tethered on a slope has no velocity, but it is the mass of the object that causes it to pull on the tether. Perhaps this is momentum without velocity, even to some minds, without force? Anyone agree with me?

I'm interested in detailed but very conventional explanations of how this MIGHT work AT ALL

Be careful not to conflate velocity with force. Velocity is NOT force.
Update: "Big Daddy" [1] mass upon a slope has a vector if it can roll. [2] such a vector does not require motion, as shown by the fact that an rolling object held by a tether on a slope enacts a stretching force upon the tether.
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