why is there no 1p or 2d orbital?

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    orbitals are where you can find the electrons in an atom. the 1s orbital is closest to the nucleus, then 2s, then 2p, 3s, and so forth

    now, think of an atom as a dart board. the bulls eye is in the middle, and it is the center of the board. compare that to the nucleus being the center of the atom.

    the orbitals would be like the rings surrounding the dart board...the ring closest to the bulls eye is the smallest and it is less likely that you would find a lot of darts in that ring

    same with the orbitals; the orbital (1s) closest to the nucleus is the smallest, therefore there will be less electrons found.

    as you go further and further away from the bulls eye, you will have a greater chance of finding more darts in those outer rings since they are larger

    once again, same goes with the orbitals. the outer rings of the atom (such as 3s, 3p, 3d, 4s, etc.) will have more electrons in them since they are larger

    so to answer your question, you cannot have a 1p orbital since you could not fit it in the 1st energy level since it is too small...also with a 2d orbital; you could not fit it in the 2nd energy level because it is pretty small as well. as you get to higher energy levels, they will get bigger, meaning more orbitals can fit in it. that is why each energy level has one more orbital than the previous one

    hope i helped, have a great day and remember: you're beautiful :)))

    Source(s): 10th grade chem !! :)
  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    the atom is spherical

    thus the closer that you get to the core, the smaller the circumference of the sublevel

    since there isnt much space at the lower sublevels, not as many orbitals can fit

    thats why you dont have those orbitals

    (later on you will learn about hybridized orbitals, that combine the orbitals together to form a new orbital, such as spd)

  • witold
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    No 1p

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