Why are some people holding onto their old manual Royal typewriters?

They're not using them. Are they worth a lot now? Do you still have one?

My parents had a very nice antique cash register from the 1800's that they used in their mom and pop country store. I wish I knew what happened to it. It was huge and you had to know how to make change. LOL

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  • 8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Hmm - I remember Royal typewriters - from way back when.

    Keep them well clean and oiled - away from the dust - you never know what they'll be worth in 25 or 50 years' time. Well machined - they ought to work just as well in say 2050 as they did back in 1950.

    So long as you also keep the red and black typewriter ribbon in good condition.

    Value ?

    Who's to know ? - but antique already - they ought only increase in value.

    Well worth keeping !

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  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    I am fascinated by this. I wonder where your info comes from. I have always believed that Royals were the best typewriters ever made, but I didn't know there were others who agreed with me.

    I still have a Royal portable from the 1930s that I've owned for decades. And I still use it for all my correspondence. (There are some advantages to sending someone a letter written on an old typewriter. If it's a personal letter, the handmade quality of it is a homey touch. And if it's business, it scares the recipient, because they know right away that you're a crackpot, and therefore possibly dangerous.)

    But as far as I know, they're not all that valuable. I collect old typewriters, most of which are not worth much. The last time I checked on ebay, a Royal portable like the one I use, in good condition, costs about thirty or forty dollars.

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  • 8 years ago

    I have a manual, not a Royal though, my mother had that one. I also have an electric typewriter that can be hooked up to the computer as a printer. Never used it as such, though. I was taught on Royal machines, typed 80 wpm. Can't do that anymore, sadly. But it will be nice to have a manual should the electricity go.

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  • 8 years ago

    I have an old Remmington manual typewriter and I keep it because it's still used from time to time. It has fabric ribbon, half red and half black and it's very heavy. It takes a long time to type something on it. I have no idea what it would be worth but it belonged to my great grandmother so I'm not interested in selling it anyway.

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  • DeeJay
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    We had an Underwood typewriter for years.

    I can't recall what we did with it.

    They had a Brass cash register on Antiques

    Roadshow night before last. It was a beauty.

    Worth 6 thousand dollars. 1800's 1900's.

    DeeJay.

    Source(s): This link takes you right to the cash register. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/archive/200904A13...
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  • Tigger
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    I bought a typewriter when I went into high school and I went to typing class. When I got out of high school I never used the knowledge for 25 years until computers came out. Then I was glad I had typing class, it oozed up from the deep grey crannies pretty fast...

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  • 8 years ago

    Because I want my children and grandchildren to know the the sheer joy of typing 45 words a minute on the doggone manual typewriter.

    I haven't seen any worth a lot. (finding the ribbon might be worth something)

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  • 8 years ago

    I have one in the basement along with everything else I will ever need or want. Who knows...the electricity could go out, and I may have to type something. Do not have an electric one. I also have a treadle sewing machine which I used to make clothes on. Need something?

    Source(s): Me.
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  • 8 years ago

    Don't know about Royal typewriters but I have an old Adler portable with the red/black fabric ribbon. Never use it now but it's in its case as good as new.

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  • Pat
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    I saw a documentary a while back on typewriters.

    They are indeed valuable.

    The reason - rarity.

    Typewriter companies strongly encouraged trading in the old ones so they could be destroyed.

    They did not want used ones on the market competing with new sales.

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