Cops answer to internal affairs, who does internal affairs answer to?

I guess what I'm asking is, who polices the police's police?

Update:

So...no answers, just smartasses. Nice.

8 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    8 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    This is entirely dependent on the state and city where the department is.

    Some cities have citizen review boards where they are either elected positions, or picked by the mayor or city counsel. The citizen review boards sole purpose is to review complaints and use of force situations.

    Internal affairs will write a report and send it to the district attorney who will either recommend a grand jury takes place, or not. In some instances, for instance where an officer shoots and kills a suspect, the district attorney must have convene a grand jury regardless. District attorneys are elected positions for the most part.

    Police will sometimes answer directly to the mayor, city counsel, or city manager.

    Again depending on the state, any complaint or review of use of force may be reviewed by the state licensing board. It's also not uncommon for the state police to investigate department matters. In some cases where the state police are being investigator, it can be the state attorney general, governor's office, or a committee set up by the state senate.

    In some cases it's actually the FBI that will investigate corruption within a department. A good example of this is the New Orleans Police Department several years back. The FBI itself is regulated by Office of Inspector General, the President, and the United States Senate.

    Just about all the above positions that oversee law enforcement are elected positions, and can be replaced if the majority of the citizen population is angry about the situation and wants another person in the position.

    Source(s): Active police officer.
  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    In my city internal affairs only handles corruption and violations of department rules. Such things as police misconduct, brutality, etc is already handled by a civilian investigative arm of the city. They are controlled by a civilian police board and the mayor.

    The civilian investigative arm has its own investigators, usually retired Fed agents of some sort and subpoena power

    In reality if there is a problem with any of those the prosecutor's office also investigates wrong doing by the police, in my county called the office of professional accountability, the state attorney general also has the power and of course the US Attorney for the area is always looking to find something on cops right before they decide to run for political office.

  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    Infernal affairs. Exfernal affairs. Eternal affairs.

    It's an endless loop.

  • 8 years ago

    Depends of the setup for the particular location. In most cases, at least in city departments, they answer to the city manager, who answers to the city council, who answers to the people.

    For county sheriffs, it would be the board of supervisors.

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  • q S
    Lv 7
    8 years ago

    The internal affairs office usually reports directly to the chief. They report suspected crimes directly to the prosecutors office.

  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    THE COPS. And I'm not bullcrappin you either.

  • Anonymous
    8 years ago

    Who watches the watchmen..?

  • 8 years ago

    their supervisors

    judges

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