Jim Crow Laws, Black Codes, Plessy v. Ferguson ??? (14th Amendment)?

I'm writing a paper on the 14th Amendment. I'm trying to clarify why Section one of the 14th Amendment was so important. I want to mention:

1) The Jim Crow Laws

2) The Black Codes,

3) Plessy v. Ferguson

4) Brown v. Board of Education

I've read several articles on this I'm just confused, what came first, how did it all come together or basically, what does this have to do with the 14th Amendment....

So confusing.. Please feel free to post any good websites that might make all this really clear for me.

Thank you so much!

Section one states, “All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. “

1 Answer

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  • tuffy
    Lv 7
    8 years ago
    Best Answer

    During Reconstruction following the U.S. Civil War the Southern states of the Confederacy passed the Black Codes which was just another form of slavery. The Codes dictated what blacks could and could not do. In addition laws were passed that segregated the blacks from the whites, these were called Jim Crow laws. Plessy v Ferguson was a Supreme Court decision that said segregation was legal as long as the blacks had equal facilities (believe me they were never equal).So up to this point the blacks had been segregated in the Southern states by state law and with Plessy v Ferguson by federal law. This never changed until 1954 when the Supreme Court said in Brown v Board of Education that segregation was illegal in the public schools. In 1955 the Civil Rights efforts began in earnest when Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on the bus to a white man.

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