how do i write a c++ program that prints the integer equivalent of a character typed at the keyboard.?

(Integer Equivalent of a Character) Here is a peek ahead. In this chapter you learned about integers and the type int. C++ can also represent uppercase letters, lowercase letters and a considerable variety of special symbols. C++ uses small integers internally to represent each different character. The set of characters a computer uses and the corresponding integer representations for those characters are called that computer's character set. You can print a character by enclosing that character in single quotes, as with

cout << 'A'; // print an uppercase A

You can print the integer equivalent of a character using static_cast as follows:

cout << static_cast< int >( 'A' ); // print 'A' as an integer

This is called a cast operation (we formally introduce casts in Chapter 4). When the preceding statement executes, it prints the value 65 (on systems that use the ASCII character set). Write a program that prints the integer equivalent of a character typed at the keyboard. Store the input in a variable of type char. Test your program several times using uppercase letters, lowercase letters, digits and special characters (like $).

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  • ?
    Lv 7
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    While static_cast is the most appropriate solution, for added variety, you can use the under-appreciated C++ operator "unary plus". I wonder how many textbooks even care to explain what it does.

    #include <iostream>

    int main()

    {

         std::cout << "Enter a character: ";

         char x;

         std::cin >> x;

         std::cout << "The ASCII value of " << x << " is " << +x << '\n';

    }

    test: https://ideone.com/gmTZD

  • 9 years ago

    It's very easy Question ... and also very easy Answer

    char x = 'A';

    cout<<(int)x;

    Have Fun with Programming Language :)

  • 9 years ago

    char input;

    cin>>input;

    cout<<(int)input;

    Very simple.

    Edit:

    You don't always need to type static_cast.

    You could use the C-style cast instead:

    cout << (int)'A';

  • 7 years ago

    Another way you can do is :

    #include <iostream.h>

    #include<conio.h>

    void main()

    {

    char c;

    int d;

    clrscr();

    cout<<"Enter any key"<<endl;

    cin>>c;

    d=c;

    cout<<"Corresponding ascii is "<<d;

    getch();

    }

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