Iz asked in Food & DrinkNon-Alcoholic Drinks · 9 years ago

Why can't I buy high fructose corn syrup at the market?

If high fructose corn syrup is so "natural", then why can't we buy it at the market and use it in our recipes? It just makes me more suspicious of it. The most used sweetener in America is not even available for the general public to purchase?!?! Hmmmm.... Sounds very weird.

Update:

llama ----- I'm talking about high fructose corn syrup, not corn syrup!

Update 2:

Mike --- I've always hated HFCS since I was a little kid, thanks to Galco's soda pop stop. Anyways I have researched HFCS pretty well. Here are a few of the things wrong with it: It does not cause your body to feel full; so it allows you to consume more (personal experience). It has some mercury in it. Rats fed HFCS gained more weight than rats fed sucrose. It is controversial!! Cane sugar tastes better (Supposedly)(personal experience). HFCS contains reactive carbonyls. So, yeah I'll stick to cane sugar. You can have HFCS.

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  • 9 years ago
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    High Fructose Corn Syrup is a clear crystalline liquid that is transported much like gasoline--in big tanker trucks or railway tank cars. Only restaurants and other major users can buy it.

    According to the Corn Refiners Association: “because they are nearly compositionally equivalent­, the human body cannot tell the difference between high fructose corn syrup and sugar."

    Not true. HFCS 55, the most common formulation, has 10% more fructose than table sugar, a large difference that will impact metabolism in a very bad way. Excessive fructose consumption causes fatty liver disease or cirrhosis of the liver--the disease associated with alcoholism.

    University of Southern California lab testing showed that bottled full-calor­ie soft drinks from the major beverage companies had fructose estimates of 64-65%, which equates to 18% higher fructose consumptio­n compared to HFCS 55, and about 30% higher compared to sucrose.

    A 2010 Princeton University experiment showed rats gained belly fat when fed HFCS but not when fed sucrose (table sugar). Mercury contamination is common, while a Rutgers University study has implicated reactive carbonyls in causing diabetes.

    Since the mid 1970s HFCS has replaced about 50% of the sweeteners used in America. This constitutes one of the largest alterations of food production in American history.

    Source(s): Bill Chameides, Duke University, Princeton University, Rutgers University, University of Southern California-Keck School of Medicine, Corn Refiners Association
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  • Mike
    Lv 5
    9 years ago

    It would be impractical to sell it so the common consumer. Especially because the recipe measurements don't work like they would with cane sugar.

    And I think you need to understand more about organic chemistry before you jump on the bandwagon bashing HFCS. There is a 50/50 mix of fructose and glucose in corn sugar. Make that proportion 51% fructose and 49% glucose, you have just made HFCS! fructose just tastes sweeter to our taste buds so it makes a more practical sweetener to the food industry. And of course you will become fat from HFCS when you eat it every day! IT IS SUGAR! You cant eat candy all day and be surprised that you gained weight!

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  • Alyce
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    HFCS is sold to manufactures in powdered form and must be reconstituted with pure water, mixed to a certain consistency and then Incorporated into a product pretty quickly. The process is impractical for home use.

    Just like you won't find food-grade lecithin sold in stores, either - it required emulsification in order for it to be used as a dough conditioner. There are a lot of ingredients like that.

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  • 9 years ago
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