France during the middle ages?

I'm doing a project for french class and i can't find anything for this project! It's about France during the middle ages. It would be great if you could help me with these last two questions:

the way of thinking in France during the middle ages

the political ideas in France during the middle ages

Any help i can get would be great! Thanks :D

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    During the latter years of the elderly Charlemagne's rule, the Vikings made advances along the northern and western perimeters of his kingdom. After Charlemagne's death in 814 his heirs were incapable of maintaining any kind of political unity and the once great Empire began to crumble. Viking advances were allowed to escalate, their dreaded longboats were sailing up the Loire and Seine Rivers and other inland waterways, wreaking havoc and spreading terror.

    In 843 the Viking invaders murdered the Bishop of Nantes and a few years after that, they burned the Church of Saint-Martin at Tours. Emboldened by their successes, in 845 the Vikings ransacked Paris.

    During the reign of Charles the Simple (898-922) whose territory comprised much of the France of today, he was forced to concede to the Vikings a large area on either side of the Seine River, downstream from Paris, that was to become Normandy.

    The Carolingians were subsequently to share the fate of their predecessors: after an intermittent power struggle between the two families, the accession (987) of Hugh Capet, duke of France and count of Paris, established on the throne the Capetian dynasty which with its Valois and Bourbon offshoots was to rule France for more than 800 years.

    The Carolingian era had seen the gradual emergence of institutions which were to condition France's development for centuries to come: the acknowledgement by the crown of the administrative authority of the realm's nobles within their territories in return for their (sometimes tenuous) loyalty and military support, a phenomenon readily visible in the rise of the Capetians and foreshadowed to some extent by the Carolingians' own rise to power.

    The new order left the new dynasty in immediate control of little beyond the middle Seine and adjacent territories, while powerful territorial lords such as the 10th and 11th-century counts of Blois accumulated large domains of their own through marriage and through private arrangements with lesser nobles for protection and support.

    The area around the lower Seine, ceded to Scandinavian invaders as the duchy of Normandy in 911, became a source of particular concern when duke William took possession of the kingdom of England in 1066, making himself and his heirs the king's equal outside France (where he was still nominally subject to the crown).

    Worse was to follow, with the succession (1154) to the disputed English throne of Henry II, already count of Anjou and duke of Normandy before his marriage (1152) to France's newly-divorced ex-queen Eleanor of Aquitaine brought him control also of much of south-west France. A century of intermittent warfare brought Normandy once more under French control (1204) and French victory at Bouvines (1214).

    The 13th century was to bring the crown important gains also in the south, where a papal-royal crusade against the region's Albigensian or Cathar heretics (1209) led to the incorporation into the royal domain of Lower (1229) and Upper (1271) Languedoc. Philippe IV's seizure of Flanders (1300) was less successful, ending two years later in the rout of her knights by the forces of the Flemish cities at the "battle of the spurs" near Courtrai (Kortrijk).

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  • Lili
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    What you really need to do is read books on Europe in the Middle Ages, since these will all include information on France, I guarantee it. For political ideas, you are best off studying individual kings and developments during their reigns, but culturally speaking, what's going on France is going to be similar to what's happening elsewhere on the Continent and even in Britain, where the upper classes spoke French until the late Middle Ages and medieval English nobles often owned property in France.

    But the information available online simply cannot yet substitute for what's available in good libraries. Maybe someday, but not yet.

    An interesting medieval French monarch whose reign can be said to have initiated the development of France towards a modern nation-state was Philip IV. He'd be worth examining. See below

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  • 9 years ago

    They were Catholic. They believed in witches. They still had nobility. The Black Plague killed a lot of them. They fought the English a lot ... those two nations had like a 100 year war!! Everyone was gross and dirty because they hated hygiene.

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  • 9 years ago

    Try asking your question in the history section, rather than royalty, since nobody here seems to be leaping to answer.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Yes, I'm sure it would be "great" to have other people do the thinking for you. Brilliant! Good work!

    Fail.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    What connects your question to royalty?

    Why did you post it here?

    And why do you think we have to do your homework for you?

    See, we can help you out with some things, but...doing your research FOR you...that's just cheating. This is something that it's just EASY for you to do for yourself.

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