Anonymous
Anonymous asked in TravelUnited StatesPhiladelphia · 9 years ago

Why are so many SUBURBS of Philadelphia so poor?

Like Camden NJ, Cheltenham PA, Chester PA, Coatesville PA, Wilmington DE, Vineland NJ, Atlantic City NJ, Asbury Park NJ, Salisbury MD, Norristown PA, Pottstown PA, Reading PA, Allentown PA, Lancaster PA, Harrisburg PA, and so on and so forth?

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  • 9 years ago
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    Your wrong in your observation.

    Camden, Chester Wilmington etc. are CITIES. They are both demographically, sociologically and politically referred to as CITIES. Cities are URBAN centers, NOT SUBURBS.

    In your list, you only mentioned a couple of places that are "suburbs" Chletneham Township PA is one. Cheltenham is anything but poor. It does have a less appealing side of town, along its border with Philadelphia along Cheltenham Avenue. But, it is listed as a "Urban Township" and if you ere to ride through it, you will see that is is a very diverse township, with lots a very wealthy neighborhoods.

    Asbury Park, Harrisburg, Salisbury MD are not even part of the Philadelphia metropolitan area, and have no real relation to the city, other than they are in within a three hour drive.

    Norrsitown is known as the "municipality" of Norristown, and Pottstown is a "Borough" but both are really closer to being third class cities than anything else. Coatesville and Chester are both third class cities. They are in the metropolitan area, but let's face it, cities are cities.

    What you have detected, is that most small American cities are in pretty bad shape. Look at new Haven Connceticut or Richmond Va or Gary Indidiana. I bet you have never been in Detroit or its metropolitan area. In fact, aside from BIG cities, like NY, Philadelphia and LA, most US cities have many more bad neighborhoods than nice ones. No matter where you go. I tend to blame poverty, section 8 housing, and poorly run education systems. Lack of ownership and lack of pride coupled by absentee landlords who receive guaranteed government subsidized rent seems to promote slums. And slums make things look bad, even for the hard working, decent people who struggle to keep it together in the inner cities.

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  • 9 years ago

    Well, the trend is that the poor are being priced out of the city center, so that is part of the reason, but the only one that could actually be considered "poor" would be Camden and possibly Wilmington.

    Off the top of my head, Asbury Park and Harrisburg are too far to be considered suburbs of Philadelphia, and Lancaster, Reading, and Allentown are a stretch.

    I hope this information was very helpful.

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  • 9 years ago

    Your list is NOT of the suburbs of Philadelphia. The only suburbs would be Cheltenham, Chester, and Norristown. These suburbs have some expensive areas and some poor areas. In Cheltenham, which I'm most familiar with, the poorest areas are adjacent to Phila. As you get further away from the county line, the township becomes well to do.

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  • 9 years ago

    Do some research, most of those aren't even suburbs of Philadelphia. Salisbury, MD must be at least 125 miles from Philadelphia.

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  • 9 years ago

    1. Your idea that the state capital is a suburb of Philadelphia adds to the foolishness of this question.

    2. Your idea of poor is screwy as well. Is all of America Beverly Hills?

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  • 5 years ago

    liberals again

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