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ME!!
Lv 5
ME!! asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 10 years ago

Chinese language speakers?

does this make sense? (there are no tone marks, sorry)

ni hao. wan dan lan, xie xie ni de lai xin. ni xian bie zhao ji. Ru guo shuo fu mu, he gao su ta men ni zui xi huan xue xi lu you he ni zhenmeyisi xue yi, ta men ke neng lie jie ran hou. Ta shi ni de xuan ze, ta men bu neng jue ding shi shen me ni jie da yu zhe, ta bu gong ping.

obviously, i suck at the chinese language, but can you please make the necessary corrections? Thanks.

2 Answers

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  • tl;dr
    Lv 6
    10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    I'm going to try to help, but I'll need some more information from you.

    First, let me try to back-translate what you wrote so that I know we're on the same page:

    Hello, "wan dan lan"*1 (name), thanks for your mail. Don't worry. If you tell*2 your parents, and let them know that travel*3 is your favorite thing to study, and the reason(s) you want to study it*4, they may understand better then*5. It*6 is your choice, they can't decide what you--jie da yu zhe--that's*6 not fair.

    Now some questions and notes about your passage:

    *1 I'm assuming this is the addressee's name.

    note: In Chinese, the person's name comes before the greeting. sb: "wan dan lan, ni hao"

    *2 I'm not sure why you used "shuo"(say) and later "gao su" (tell) .

    note: "and" (he) is not necessary or correct in this particular case, sequential verbs in Chinese can simply be separated with pause/comma.

    *3 Is this "travel and tourism"? sb. lv3 you2

    *4 I don't know what "ni zhenmeyisi xue yi" means, you'll have to tell me. Same rule about "and" again.

    *5 The Chinese if/then structure doesn't work this way and strictly speaking "ran hou" means "following that", not "then" (in that case--sb. na4 jiu4/ na4 me*) or "then"(at that time--sb. na4 (ge*) shi2 hou4).

    The proper structure is "ruguo/yao shi..de hua, ...(jiu4/ na4 me*)...". examples:

    "ruguo ni zhunshi dao de hua, jiu mei shi"---if you arrive on time (then) it'll be fine.

    "ni yao shi meiyou zhunbei de hua, ni jintian jiu buyong kaoshi"---if (in the case that) you haven't prepared, (then) you shouldn't/don't have to take the test today.

    "jiaru ta tou le, women jiu dei daibu ta"---if (we assume)/assuming/in the event that he stole it/were to steal it*, (then) we have to arrest him.

    Chinese doesn't always grammatically distinguishing real/imaginary conditionals "jia ru" can set up a real (if he does (in the future), if he did in fact) or imaginary (if he were to do) conditional.

    Just like the English "then" component of this structure, the "jiu"(just/simply) in Chinese is optional.

    You probably know that he/she/it are identical in spoken Chinese. Chinese does not refer to immaterial things like concepts/situations with "ta"(it), instead they use "this" or "that", in both cases, you should use "this" (zhe4).

    Now let's rewrite your passage so that it means what you intended it to mean, and so that it is grammatically correct.

    wan dan lan, ni hao! xie xie ni de lai xin. ni xian bie zhao ji. Ruguo ni qu gaosu ni de fu mu, rang tamen zhidao ni zui xi huan xue xi de jiu shi lv you de hua, hai you ni wei shen me xiang yao xuexi lv you, ta men ying gai neng li jie. Zhe shi ni de xuan ze, ni de fu mu buneng lai jue ding zhe me zhong yao de shi qing, zhe dui ni lai shuo shi bu gong ping de.

    Here's a line-for-line translation of what I've written (words in brackets are not written in the Chinese, but reflect the way a Chinese reader will interpret the writing, numbers are tones):

    wan dan lan, ni hao! xie xie ni de lai xin. ni xian bie zhao ji--wan dan lan, hello! Thanks for your mail/message. Don't worry.

    Ruguo ni qu gaosu ni de fu mu, rang tamen zhidao ni zui xi huan xue xi de jiu shi lv you de hua, --If you go [and] (qu4) tell you parents, [and] if (...de* hua4) [you] let (rang4) them know studying travel is (jiu4 shi4) what you like the most,

    hai you ni wei shen me yao xuexi lv you, ta men ying gai neng li jie.--and also (hai2 you3) why you want to study travel, they should be able to (ying1 gai1 neng2) understand.

    Zhe shi ni de xuan ze, ni de fu mu bu neng lai jue ding zhe me zhong yao de shi qing,--This is your choice, your parents should not (bu4 neng2 (in this context means "should not", not "can't")) decide such an important (zhong4 yao4) matter (shi4 qing2),

    zhe dui ni lai shuo shi bu gong ping de--this is not fair to/for you (dui4 ni3 lai2 shuo1)

    note: the use of "lai2 zuo4" (come [verb of doing]) to emphasize a particular agent ("doer" of a verb):

    ni de fumu bu neng lai jue ding...--your *parents* shouldn't decide...

    note: the use of the "shi4...de*" construction to reinforce an assertion:

    ...zhe shi bu gong ping de

    Please let me know if my substituted phrases are right.

    I still fondly remember struggling to write my first letter to a friend in Chinese with one of my Chinese speaking American friends, I learned a lot. Good times...

    Also, your friend may have a lot of difficulty reading your toneless pinyin, imagine if someone sent you an English message written in the English IPA: ‘kən juː ən-dər-‘stænd ðis? (can you understand this?)

    Wan dan lan, 你好!谢谢你的来信。 你先别着急。如果你去告诉你的父母,让他们知道你最喜欢学习的就是旅游的话,

    还有你为什么想要学习旅游,他们应该能理解。这是你的选择,

    你的父母不能来决定这么重要的事情,这对你来说是不公平的。

    Then again, you guys may communicate in toneless pinyin all the time, just lookin' out.

    Source(s): I speak Mandarin
  • EeeLLL
    Lv 4
    10 years ago

    Heheh I like your Chinese. Type it in English, easier for me to translate it for you. It's a little confusing to see those hanyu pinyin (even with the tone)

    Source(s): I'm a Chinese :D but not from China!
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