Power outages during a hurricane?

This may seem like a dumb question to people who have experienced hurricanes, but I never have before where I Live in CT. They are saying if power does get knocked out it could be a week or More before it is back on. My question is for people who have lost power during Hurricanes. Does it usually really take that long to get the power back on, and with a Hurricane of 50-70 mph winds is there any chance of not loosing power. I know the Second half of that question might seem, dumb but I have never been though this, and would like to know as much I can in advance.

Thanks =)

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  • 9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    I had hurricane Isbel come through 10 years ago and we lost power for 2-3 days and some areas like country areas did loose power up to 1week. just depends on location i guess. When I lived in AL, we got hurricanes all the time and power was out for only like 1 maybe 1 1/2 day

    Source(s): experience
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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    The combination of rain and wind can be counted on to drop a tree or two on power lines. Normally, the priority to restoring power is hospitals, emergency services, downtown (stores, etc.) then the residential areas. The longest we were without power was 10 days, the shortest 4 days during hurricanes. Here where we get hurricanes regularly, nearly everyone has a generator.

    Source(s): Life on the Gulf Coast
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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    It usually goes out.. I live in NC, we get hurricanes here often and the power always goes out... the longest we were without power here was back in the 1999 hurricane, it was out for nearly 2 weeks in some area... we also had massive flooding there so they had to wait until some water cleared to fix the lines.

    It depends on what kind of damage is done, how many power lines are down and where they are, etc... usually they have it fixed within 3 days tops (and mostly much sooner). But it always goes out like clockwork! For at least a few hours.

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  • 9 years ago

    Being from Louisiana I've been through SEVERAL hurricanes. The worst hurricane I've been through was a category 3 when it hit us, we had no power for a week and it was awful. But we were in a VERY small town it's 2 miles by 5 mile, so we didn't have enough electricians near us to get everyone back on the grid. In your city, if you were to loose power, they would try to get it turned on as soon as they could. Anyways, that storm was bigger then Irene. I'm sure Irene will shrink down to size before it hits you, I don't think you should worry about it to much.

    Source(s): I always loved hurricanes, we would always hang out on the front porch as they came by. :)
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  • 9 years ago

    I have been through several hurricanes. I was lucky in all of them and didn't get much damage. That is because the storms were small and I was far enough away from the eye to avoid the truly bad stuff. Here we are very low but we have a way to let the water out to the sea so that our streams can take the abundance of runoff with out serious flooding. But there are places that are built low and without any way for the water to run off without damage. With Hurricane Dolly that went north of us, there were places that were flooded for months and roads that were under for weeks. I never lost electricity but my sister and her daughter went out almost immediately and were out for about a week. It all is relative to how much damage is done and how fast your people get the repairs done. It can take weeks depending on who gets power restored first. Be prepared and also have enough drinking water stored...for you, your family and your pets. It is wise to stock up on flashlights, batteries, radio...there are even crank ones that don't need batteries. Here's the story on hurricane winds...they are talking sustained winds. . .the gusts will be higher. At 50 trees will blow in a circle and twist and then spring back or break. You will have severe damage to your trees. At 70 it feels like you can fly and the wind will pull you up off the ground. Also anything not secured will become missiles and fly into you and your windows. Also have a good supply of cash...ATMs will not be working nor will gas pumps so fill up early. I don't board up for tropical storms but for a category one it is a wise thing. I'll stay for a small cat 1 but anything higher and I'm off to visit someone inland. You also need to know that tropical weather spawns a lot of tornadoes. Don't be afraid. Just be smart and prepared. And if you leave, don't leave late and get trapped in the storm on the highway. There is a lot of info for you at the site I gave you.

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  • 9 years ago

    There is always the possibility of the power going out during a storm, and if it does go out just call the power company and they will send a truck out to fix the lines as soon as possible. In reality though if you live in the city uou get it turned back on faster since it takes priority over rural areas, and don't worry no matter what it should be back on at the latest in 24 hours

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    I haven't been through a hurricane, but I've been through a microburst which did serious damage (seriously, it was a five minute storm that knocked down hundreds of trees, flooded lots of areas, and took our power out for a week).

    I'd say it'd be like a week, just like that microburst. It could be less, it could be more. It depends on how fast the electric companies work.

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  • 9 years ago

    It really depends on a lot of things, and it's impossible to know in advance.

    I lived in Florida during the insane 2004 and 2005 storm seasons. I was more or less hit by Frances and Jeanne -- lost a week of school to each one. (We call it hurrication.) But my house never lost power at all during or after those storms.

    On the other hand, we got whalloped by Wilma in 2005. My house didn't have power for two weeks (and no school for two weeks again), but I know that we were some of the last people affected to get power back.

    Don't believe everything people are saying about electricians. Power companies have emergency response plans to bring power back on after a natural disaster, and they're moving trucks and equipment to strategic locations right now so they're ready after the storm. After all, this isn't going to be too far from what happens when they have to fix power lines after a really large blizzard.

    (Plus, many power lines in Florida are buried underground but most aren't around your area. This makes them more vulnerable to storm damage, yes. But it's much, much easier to fix damage to a cable that isn't underground.)

    Edited to add:

    @Towanda: Sweet Jesus, what were you doing outside in 70 mph winds?

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  • 9 years ago

    It usually takes longer for very highly populated areas, or out in the country. We lost power for 3 days due to a snow storm because we live in the middle of no where. I would still be prepared as much as you can food wise. you cant cook without electricity

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  • 9 years ago

    Katrina took them out for months. Ike took it out for almost a month. Rita, two weeks.

    It will take min of two weeks no matter what the news tell you. Electricions evacuate as well. They have to give them time to come home to work as well. yes 50 to 70 mile winds are serious, you will most likely lose power.

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