Bri asked in Pregnancy & ParentingBaby Names · 10 years ago

Rowan? Is this a Boy's Name or a Girl's Name?

I hear it used on both, but I always thought of it on a boy. Is it more commonly used on one gender then the other, or is it a pretty even split OR is it strictly belonging to one category?

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  • 10 years ago
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    It's both and traditionally unisex although I have met only a few boys named Rowan and mostly toddlers in the last few years! It seems to be gaining popularity within both genders.

    None of my friends see Rowan as a boys name but that's because I am a most definitely female 27 year old Rowan! I think it's fine so long as if you are naming a girl give her a really girlie middle name as my mother kindly gave me a unisex middle name too spelt the boys way. Thanks mother!

    I hated my name when I was young - other people over the years have commented on how pretty is but I never understood that as a child! still not convinced now!

    I have had schools and employers expect a male.

    I always wanted to be called Sarah, Katie or Kelly (yes I was a child of the eighties!) but now I'm glad I don't share my name with any friends/acquaintances unlike all the Sarahs, Kellys and Katies I know!

    Neither do I think it's a trendy name it's hardly up there with made up/spelt terribly names and there's still not many of either sex. Brooke Sheilds had her daughter years ago. I wonder how common Harper (actually don't mind Harper so much) or Princess will be in 5 years time.

    Source(s): myself!
  • 10 years ago

    Well the only person I know named Rowan is a girl. But it might be more commonly used on a boy, I'm not sure. I think it works on either but I'd say it's probably more masculine than feminine if I had to choose.

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    I know it seems to be more popular as a boys name, I think it works better for a girl in my opinion. I feel like it is not really a strong boys name yet gives strength when acting as a name for a girl. I have always been fond of names that can double for both boys and girls but tend to feel names that fit boys more in other peoples opinions are more appropriate on girls in mine.

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    It is not strictly boy or girl. I know a girl named Rowan, and that is the only person I have ever met named Rowan, so I associate it with girls.

    I think if you like it you should use it. Although I would only use it on an Irish redhead. The name literally means redhead. Haha. (The girl I know is a redhead)

    Source(s): life
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  • 10 years ago

    Actually its BOTH :)

    The girl name Rowan is also used as a boy name, and it is more frequently a boy name but Rowan is becoming a rather popular baby girl name, and it is also regarded as rather trendy. The name has been growing in popularity since the 2000.

  • Rowan is strictly a masculine boys name. There is absolutely nothing feminine, girlie or unisex about it. Rowan is terrible on girls and I don't understand why people use such a masculine name on girls.

  • C18764
    Lv 5
    10 years ago

    I work with young children and I know two little boys named Rowan and one little girl named Rowan. I think it suits either gender fine, honestly. So, probably a bit more common for boys, but definitely still popular for girls.

  • 10 years ago

    I think it is traditionally a name for a male but, like other male names, recently it has also been used as a girls name. I can see it working well for either a boy or a girl but I think it sounds better for a girl.

  • 10 years ago

    Lol i asked a similar question about this name a couple of days ago.

    I know 4 Rowan's, and 2 are boys and 2 are girls lol, so it's pretty evenly split where I live but i think I prefer it for a boy, but I think it is cute for a girl as well.

    :)

  • 10 years ago

    I think I hear it more for boys. But it's one of the few names I actually like for both.

    As far as I'm concerned, it's a nature name and fair game for either.

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