Heat of Combustion chemistry question?

How many liters of C6H14(l), measured at 20 degrees C, must be burned to provide enough heat to warm 25.2 m^3 of water from 16.7 to 38.1 degrees C, assuming that all the heat of combustion is transferred to the water, which has a specific heat of 4.18 J/(g * degrees C)? Recall that 1 mL = 10^-3L. This other... show more How many liters of C6H14(l), measured at 20 degrees C, must be burned to provide enough heat to warm 25.2 m^3 of water from 16.7 to 38.1 degrees C, assuming that all the heat of combustion is transferred to the water, which has a specific heat of 4.18 J/(g * degrees C)? Recall that 1 mL = 10^-3L.

This other information is also given:

A 1.722 g sample of a component of the light petroleum distillate called naphtha is found to yield 5.278 g CO2(g) and 2.521 g H2O(l) on complete combustion.

This particular compound is also found to be an alkane with one methyl group attached to a longer carbon chain and to have a molecular formula twice its empirical formula.
The compound also has the following properties:

melting point of -154 degrees C
boiling point of 60.3 degrees C
density of 0.6532 g/mL at 20 degrees C
specific heat of 2.25 J/(g*degrees C)
DeltaHf= -204.6 kJ/mol
^I think the last one might mean the heat of combustion?
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