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Andrew asked in Arts & HumanitiesHistory · 9 years ago

what country doe the name richard come from?

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  • 9 years ago
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    RICHARD

    Gender: Masculine

    Usage: English, French, German, Czech, Dutch, Ancient Germanic

    Pronounced: RICH-ərd (English), ree-SHAR (French), RIKH-ahrt (German) [key]

    Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time. It was borne by three kings of England including Richard I the Lionheart, leader of the Third Crusade in the 12th century. Famous bearers include two German opera composers, Richard Wagner (1813-1883) and Richard Strauss (1864-1949), as well as British explorer Sir Richard Burton (1821-1890) and American musician Little Richard (1920-).

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  • 9 years ago

    Its antecedents appear in a number of different Germanic dialects. You see the "-hard" element in a lot of early medieval names; I'm pretty sure the "ric-" element is a contraction from "rege/n-" (or one of its variations. At least, I can think of lots of early medieval people with names ending in "-ric" but none with names starting just "Ric-", There are lots of Regenberts, Regenhards, etc.

    Romance languages tend to take these Germanic names (from the Franks, Lombards, Visigoths, etc.) and contract them and soften them, something that's very noticeable in the ninth and tenth centuries especially. A name that had been Chruodebercht in the sixth century will become Hrodbert in the eighth century and Robert in the tenth. Richard is the same kind of name; a Germanic Frankish name like Regenhard softening over time into Richard, in France, and later spreading to England.

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  • Fitz
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    Means "brave power", derived from the Germanic elements ric "power, rule" and hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, and it has been very common there since that time.

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