Quality or quantity? When it comes to ranking?

If a martial artist is underanked, and has the skill, and proficiency of the next rank or two. Would you consider testing him even though he hasnt been the current rank very long?

Does quantity matter if he has the quality?

Recent events in my life have made me curious about this.

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  • 9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    I have seen multiple events where an over-qualified practitioner was under-ranked as well as when an under-qualified practitioner was over-ranked.

    It happens all the time.

    Now, I believe that, as long as you're putting time into training at the dojo/studio/gym, and you're qualified, you should be promoted as high as you're skill set affords.

    Rank in a dojo or system isn't just about prowess or skill, but about the dedication and earnest you display in the dojo and willingness to put it ahead of your personal ideas.

    I understand this is a very silly notion these days, when you are the sole-representative for your physical abilities, but I prefer to return the ego back to the art, style, and school which affords me the skillset to be who I am, thereby bringing name and acclaim to the art as opposed to myself.

    In this way, I believe in the short duration I have attended my dojo, I am legitamately skilled and trusted enough to be the ranks I am in the various arts I practice. Thus I prefer to relate my skill in terms of the arts I practice, as opposed to my own (or lack there of) physical ability.

    Those who collect ranks and pick and choose pieces of arts are negligent to the breadth and width of, not only the classical fighting arts, but of the social, mental, and, in a way, spiritual benefits thereby derrived.

    All of this is from my brief experience and in my own humble opinion.

    Source(s): In 5 short years of training traditional Japanese and Okinawan martial arts 2nd Dan, Iaido 1st Dan, Karatedo 4th Kyu, Jujutsu
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  • possum
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    No, I wouldn't.

    Skill and proficiency are only parts of a picture. These do not include leadership, experience, maturity, and character. You didn't mention anything about these points.

    You're suggesting someone who is recently promoted ("hasn't been the current rank very long"), say, to 1st dan. But this person is "underranked", meaning he should be 2nd or 3rd dan because of skill and proficiency?

    From an administrative standpoint, in my primary style (WTF taekwondo), you cannot skip ranks more than once per lifetime, and then only 1 rank. So in this example, going from 1st to 3rd (skipping 2nd) is possible only once. To do this, requires a bevy of supporting documentation showing why you should be 3rd dan, when you were recently only 1st kup. Kukkiwon won't approve of this, I guarantee it. You'd have to win an Olympic match or a national championship.

    In the end, quantity matters so little, I wouldn't even consider it on my list of must-have qualities.

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  • 9 years ago

    Martial arts that have a ranking structure are, by their nature, hierarchical. Imagine your younger sibling being put in charge of you, or the guy you trained at work. The argument has been put forth that rank isn't only about skill, it's about the ability to teach, lead, and represent the system/school/organization.

    Personally I tend to value skill above all of that, but it's the right of the leader to decide what qualities he or she values in those of various ranks.

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  • Jay
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    I believe if a student has shown the adequacy for what's to be expected of a certain rank in regards to not only the requirements but also in capability and capacity of his/her own vessel, then he or she should be promoted to that level/rank they demonstrate.

    I'm a bit lost on what you mean by quality and quantity. I hope I answered to what you were asking. If you're talking about what it is I'm thinking, then quality all the way.

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  • Leo L
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    I have never seen this in 16 years. I have seen students who believe that they are ready for advancement, even though they are not. I have learned to trust my instructors and I encourage you to trust your own. Rank is unimportant, in itself. What matters is the knowledge you gain and the effort and attention you put into your training. Getting all the techniques learned at every rank down cold is key to becoming a solid black belt. Don't rush. Be patient and enjoy the experience. Good luck.

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  • 9 years ago

    I spent 4 years as a white belt, 4 as a green belt and 6 as a brown.

    My Sensei just handed me the black belt and ordered me to wear it... The certificates came later.

    I was not interested in rank and I will not be awarding rank when I begin teaching again.

    If I was awarding rank, I would ask if the person would like to test. If not, I will not impose it.

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  • 9 years ago

    What's the worth of learning if a person didn't totally understand what he is doing, it's like you are loading an item in one truck but you knows that some of it are just a useless crap.

    The value of skills and knowledge is a matter that needs to consider, it is about a step by step development and improvement that pass through the right and appropriate process, proper awareness on what he is doing and what is being given.

    ……………………………………

    Source(s): Senses Good luck
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  • 9 years ago

    Quality is way more important than quantity in my opinion. After a guy gets ten fights or so under his belt he should be able to fight anyone so long as he looks impressive in them.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Bruce Lee had no belt, no sash, and no credential. I rest my case.

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