Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 9 years ago

Did 邪魔 (jama) used to be shimo in Japanese coming from the Chinese xiémó?

In English to Japanese, I believe that the meaning of jama has some resemblance to what goes on in drama but what about before the word became jama or before the English word drama existed which has some resemblance to the Greek word δράση which means action.

Update:

In speaking of しも, it now means servant. Did you know that? In Chinese, it's 僕人 and 僕 is also the character pronunciation of boku, meaning I so both the languages have gone through a lot of changes. Sort of like English and German together.

Update 2:

In speaking of しも, it now means servant. Did you know that? In Chinese, it's 僕人 and 僕 is also the character pronunciation of boku, meaning I so both the languages have gone through a lot of changes. Sort of like English and German together.

3 Answers

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    There are two ways to read 'jama', with it's onyomi and it's kunyomi. Onyomi is the Japanese approximation of the Chinese way of reading the characters, 'jama' is an onyomi word. The kunyomi for '邪' is yokoshima meaning 'wicked/evil' and 魔 (ma) has no kunyomi.

    It's hard to identify the exact date when the word was first used but the divergence from the original Chinese reading probably comes from the tones in the Chinese language where 'mo' with that tonal mark may sound like 'ma' to foreign language speakers. Also, evolutions in the Chinese language may have caused it, as those characters reading could have changed based on the different Chinese kingdoms conquering each other and just the evolution of the Japanese language. It could have been 'shimo' at one point, it may have not been. :)

    (Shimo is commonly a name, first or last, these days).

    EDIT: User OK had some good info in a post:

    "he on-pronunciations are very old: ジャ was borrowed from Chinese back in the 6th-9thC (more research would be needed to find the exact time) and マ was borrowed in the 6thC. So while the current Chinese pronunciation is almost entirely different, back when the readings were borrowed, they actually sounded similar. "

    Exactly what I was trying to say but easier to understand.

    Source(s): Yahoo! Answer User OK.
  • bungay
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    It has been an exciting area to learn approximately! I have studied Martial Arts my whole existence and am sixty two years ancient and feature discovered that the diversities are extra cultural than bodily! Although locally the Chinese within the Northern locations of China look taller and their eyes are nearer in look to the men and women who reside in Mongolia and Tibet! The Southern Chinese look shorter and their eyes are extra very similar to the Japanese and Taiwanese! This could be very subjective so I bet that's ordinarilly the best way the relaxation of the sector sees it too! The Germans did a "racial" research earlier than WWII and took facial measurements and a few of that Ido is to be had on the net in case you google it!

  • 9 years ago

    Since you seem to be so interested in this, go check what "thank you" in Portuguese is and I think your mind might just get blown. And no, once again, they're not related.

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