Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 9 years ago

Spiritually speaking, is the term "super predator" or "apex predator" a fallacy?

By definition, the term "apex predator" means: "An animal atop the food chain, preying but not prey."

Me and my friend just got into a long and heated argument about this. I said that there is no such thing as a predator that is not also a prey animal as well. He vehemently disagreed with me.

What are your thoughts on this?

Update:

(((Blooper)))

Update 2:

(((Jaydën's ♥Aunt♥)))

Update 3:

(((Darren)))

: )

10 Answers

Relevance
  • Anonymous
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Hmm.

    Both true to a certain extent. I think the problem is that these days humans trump any predator but then again, a lion could easily snatch a human as could any large predator.

    The evolutionary thought would be that all organisms are at their apex regardless so that trumps the very definition of "apex" or "top" predator because it's true of every animal.

    There are some animals that have no natural predators but they're under threat from humble viruses, like the African lion from aids http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/10/26/10671032...

    As Paul says, Great Whites are pretty high up the system but dolphins know how to deal with them. They swim up underneath them like a missile and burst their bellies with their noses. Can't think of anything that can take out an orca though, lol.

    In conclusion there's no such thing as a true apex predator, like others have said, the food chain is a "web" and there's no organism that can't be taken down by at least one other.

    As for what eats a skunk, well there's loads of animals that do. :-)

    http://www.whateats.com/what-eats-a-skunk

    Great qu ((((((Erin)))))))

    :-)

    ...

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    You're right, food "chains" are actually food webs, with predator/prey interactions amongst and between levels. Apex predators do exist in natural systems though. In India and parts of Asia for example, tigers are (or were) at the top of the food web. In the oceans (depending on the geographical location) either orca or great white sharks occupy the apex predator position.

    EDIT: As Skookum mentioned, introduction of an exotic predator into an ecosystem can "create" an apex predator. Here in New Zealand for example we have no native mammalian predators. The introduction of stoats, cats and dogs immediately placed those species at the top of local food webs.

    EDIT again: looks like there's a bit of confusion around the definition of "predator". A predator is an animal which hunts and kills another animal for food. The operative words here are "kill" and "food". Viruses and bacteria are pathogens, not predators: these use hosts to replicate their genetic material, not for food (and in most cases don't kill the host). Parasites (leeches, mosquitos etc) do feed on their hosts but ideally don't kill them. The example of the dolphins torpedoing the shark is defensive behaviour to protect the pod: they had no intention of eating the shark and were most likely attempting to drive it off rather than specifically trying to kill it. That's not predation.

    Source(s): Ecologist
    • Login to reply the answers
  • 9 years ago

    Maybe not planet-wide, but it happens locally. The introduction of exotic species might cause an apex predator situation. Anacondas or other huge constrictors will be an apex predator if introduced in certain areas without any predator strong enough to fight them, for example, outside of alligator/crocodile environments.

    There's nothing spriitual about this. It's the real world.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    I agree with you, darling.

    Your friend is clearly not understanding that predators need not be larger or fiercer than their prey, and need not hunt down and jump on prey to count as predators.

    For example, many people believe that humans are apex predators because there are no larger animals that prey on us - we aren't routinely being stalked by big cats, for example - but they never seem to remember that viruses and bacteria of all kinds do prey on us, quite successfully.

    It's a cycle, not a pyramid.

    (((Erin)))

    • Login to reply the answers
  • How do you think about the answers? You can sign in to vote the answer.
  • I bailed biology after botany, so the concept of "Apex Predator" in my mind does not extend to much beside Venus Flytraps and Pitcher Plants.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 9 years ago

    I'm afraid I have to agree with your friend. I'm thinking of the big cats. Though the lion may eventually be eaten as carrion, they are not hunted as food. I think the same applies to tigers. There are probably more and better examples and other Yahoo respondents will add them.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • 9 years ago

    We are all meat in the grinder.

    Even a top predator is eventually predated once weak or sick.

    eventually bacteria always win

    • Login to reply the answers
  • ?
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    The microbes are at the top of the food chain.

    Kuma

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Well, humans are animals and

    we prey upon each other...

    Some even pray on others.

    • Login to reply the answers
  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Ever heard of anyone eating a skunk?

    (((Erin)))

    • Login to reply the answers
Still have questions? Get your answers by asking now.