modah asked in Education & ReferenceTrivia · 10 years ago

What is the meaning of nursery rhyme A diller a dollar a 10 oclock scholar?

what makes you come so soon you used to come at 10 oclock now you come at noon

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  • 10 years ago
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    The word ‘diller’ is a Yorkshire term for a boy who is dim-witted and stupid so this rhyme seems to be a moral lesson warning the importance of punctuality. The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes by Iona and Peter Opie (Oxford, OUP, 1951) suggests that ‘a diller, a dollar’ are taken from the words dilatory and dullard or that maybe ‘a diller, a dollar’ is related to dilly-dally. As English schools traditionally started at nine o’clock or earlier, anyone who arrived even at ten o’clock would certainly be very late.

    (had never heard that one :)

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    ADDED

    A ‘diller’ according to the New Geordie Dictionary (the dialect spoken by Geordies – natives of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England) by Graham is an ‘unwilling scholar,’ – a lazy student who isn’t too excited about having to do the work required of him. In the above Mother Goose nursery rhyme (circa 1760) an unwilling and ‘unpunctual’ student is being chastised for his tardiness and this nursery rhyme had, in fact, become a children’s chant used to chide a student who was late for school.

  • 5 years ago

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    RE:

    What is the meaning of nursery rhyme A diller a dollar a 10 oclock scholar?

    what makes you come so soon you used to come at 10 oclock now you come at noon

    Source(s): meaning nursery rhyme diller dollar 10 oclock scholar: https://shortly.im/AEio5
  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Nursery Rhymes Definition

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    Interesting

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/avc5S

    I WOULD GIVE YOU 10 EXTRA POINTS IF I COULD! Instead I'll give you a star. Luv the joke.

  • 6 years ago

    diller = diddler (one who diddles around);

    dollar = dawdler (one who dawdles);

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