Is it even possible to legally purchase a Glock 18?

I noticed that Glock first made there Glock 17 in 1982, so I assume that there could have been some Glock 18's made before 1986.

Basically, I'm asking were there some produced before 1986 and how much money would they be worth.

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  • 9 years ago
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    There are EXACTLY ZERO registered, transferable Glock 18s in existence. That is none, nada, never have been. It is a firearms myth. Anybody who claims to have seen one, seen one for sale, heard of somebody with one, etc. Is either lying or passing along a BS story someone told them. This is why there are no first hand accounts of them, it is always a "friend of a friend" or "some guy at the gunshots told me about it" type of story.

    The Hughes Amendment to the McClure-Volkmer Act of 1986 banned machine guns manufactured after May 19, 1986 from being transferred or possessed by private citizens. It only effected imported machine guns by no longer allowing licensed dealers from keeping any machine guns imported after the cutoff date after they gave up their license. This is where the division between "Pre 86" and "Post 86" dealer samples comes from. In 1968, as part of the Gun Control Act of 1968, importation of machine guns was restricted. Machine guns imported after 1968 cannot be possessed by private citizens. The only exception is if a licensed dealer (SOT) acquires a machine gun imported between 1968 and 1986, he can keep the gun after he gives up his SOT. But if he gets rid of the gun he can only transfer it to an SOT or to a government agency. It cannot ever be transferred to another individual.

    Since Glock was not making any firearms in 1968 (they were in business then, just not in the firearms business) it is impossible for there to be even a single transferrable Glock 18 in existence and since Glock did not import any Glock 18s untill after May 19, 1986 there are no "Pre 86" dealer sames either. The first Glock 17 pistols only reached the US in March of 1986.

    Anybody claiming different should provide proof in the form of a copy of an approved ATF Form 4 listing a Glock 18 and without a restricted transfer notation stamped at the bottom.

    Source(s): Was an ATF liaison for a licensed machine gun manufacturer and importer. It was my job to know about these things.
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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    Is it even possible to legally purchase a Glock 18?

    I noticed that Glock first made there Glock 17 in 1982, so I assume that there could have been some Glock 18's made before 1986.

    Basically, I'm asking were there some produced before 1986 and how much money would they be worth.

    Source(s): legally purchase glock 18: https://tr.im/hHATG
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  • 9 years ago

    This is actually a really interesting subject that I have been looking at for some time. After talking to a lot of folks that should know, looking at anecdotal information, and second hand innuendo. I have come to the conclusion that there are NO legally civilian transferable G18's in the US.

    I wish and hope that someone could prove me wrong here. But when it comes down to it after looking for a few years I have yet to find any that can be transferred - i.e. are not LEO/Military only.

    If there were to be any, and it would not shock me to find out that there are, the number can only be in the single digits or very, VERY low, which equal an unbelievable high price. I'd guess that a legally transferable G18 would start at least in the $20K range and go up from there.

    That being said, there may be a few after market transferable "switches" and conversions available but no true factory original G18's.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    While you're right: there may be some, I have personally never seen a transferable Glock 18 for sale.

    edit: Glock says there were exactly 18 imported into the US before May 1986. Its safe to assume the vast majority went to military and LE, so it seems plausible that only three transferable examples exist.

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  • 9 years ago

    I saw someone ask this question on one of the high road forums a year or so ago and the guys over there said that there are only three or four of them in the whole united states that are transferable and the last one that was sold went for over 30k. I'm not sure if all that is true but its what they said and the guys over there usually know their stuff.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    You are forgetting the ban on importation of firearms for sale to civilians. That combined with the fact that the G18 was never made before 1986 make it not possible to find a transferable f/a glock.

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  • Karle
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    short answer is NO.......

    long answer is there are 3 of them available ...but the ppl that own them are NOT selling them and last i checked one was offered 80k and turned it down......

    ** and yes there were 19 imported prior to '86.......15 went to LEO and so are NOT transferable ......4 went to civilians....one of which got destroyed/lost.....can't get clear story on that one....

    ** btw if we work at it and actual participate in the election process.....we might just be able to get rid of the current stupid firearms restrictions .......so call ur congressmen and senators and tell them u want UNRESTRICTED firearm rights

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  • 9 years ago

    I can 100% be sure in saying -- Those are not legal in New York State.....

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  • 9 years ago

    If their were any made before 1986 it will be nearly impossible to stumble across one and when you do it will be a very hefty price.

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  • 9 years ago

    Since I've seen people shoot them I would say yes. You would need a class 3 to buy one & the price of one is high.

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