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Mark Ava asked in HealthOptical · 1 decade ago

Can reading glasses help you concentrate?

4 Answers

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  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago
    Favorite Answer

    Hi

    Ok, Reading glasses may aid concentration however it depends on what you mean by "reading glasses".

    If you are under the age of 45, then it is likely that what you need is a general purpose pair of glasses that you don't need to wear all the time. This may be because you are a little long sighted.

    Consider this.

    If you pick up a bottle of ketchup and hold it out in front of you, how long could you do it for?

    It's a very light object and you find it easy but you will find your arm gets tired eventually and starts to drop a little until eventually you just can't do it any more.

    It is the same with the eyes. If you are long sighted, the muscles inside your eye are working over time to let you see clearly. This can make them tired towards the end of the day which in turn can affect concentration. Wearing the general purpose glasses to read and things throughout the day would relax the eyes, reducing eye strain and tiredness.

    If you are aged 45 or over, the muscles in the eye are still trying to do this but the lens inside your eye just isn't as flexible as it used to be. This is called Presbyopia and just means that you need a little help with focusing on close objects such as books etc. You will need the glasses to read at this point.

    Hope this is useful.

  • 1 decade ago

    Reading glasses can only help you concentrate if you find your concentration is impaired by poor vision. Consequently, if you are far-sighted or presbyopic (close up things appear blurry), reading glasses might enable you to think less about what the blurry words on the page/screen are, and more about what you need to be thinking about. In that sense, I suppose they could be said to help you concentrate. :-)

  • Anonymous
    1 decade ago

    It doesn't make much of a difference in concentration to me.

  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    1

    Source(s): Naturally Improve Vision 20/20 - http://improveeyesight.uzaev.com/?sNTj
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