Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Education & ReferenceWords & Wordplay · 10 years ago

Am I using "hence" correctly?

I was going to make a list of all my favorite authors but I highly doubt any of you will know who even Mary Balogh is. I only read historical romances, hence Mary Balogh.

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  • Anonymous
    10 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Yes, Hence can be used to introduce a logical conclusion. Though you should put... "I was going to make a list of all my favorite authors, but I highly doubt any of you will EVEN know who Mary Balogh is" or "I was going to make a list of all my favorite authors, but I highly doubt any of you will know who Mary Balogh EVEN is".

    You need a comma after but.

    And your even is in the wrong place.

    .

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Hence and thus are by common usage interchangeable, however according to the rules of grammar they are different. Hence should indicate future use - such as "Hence we will proceed as described." Thus should indicate the past in its usage, or to indicate a conclusion, such as, "The British and American troops fought to a standstill, thus no winner was declared."

    Common usage is no excuse for incorrect usage. I often interchange hence and thus when using them without thought. Tonight I heard a man say the following, "We ate like animals, we slept like animals, hence we were animals." This was incorrect, "... thus we were animals," would have been correct as cited above.

    Clearly the word in question was used to indicate a conclusion, not to describe future conditions. If the speaker had said, "We will live like animals, we will sleep like animals, hence we will be animals," the use of hence would have been correct. However, he did not, thus his use was incorrect.

    you are using it completely correctly, just do not end your first sentence with is.

    Source(s): Oh, i just plagiarized the guys above me, but its ok because i'll add a smiley! :)
  • Daniel
    Lv 5
    10 years ago

    Hence means:

    1.

    a. For this reason; therefore: handmade and hence expensive.

    b. From this source: They grew up in the Sudan; hence their interest in Nubian art.

    2. From this time; from now: A year hence it will be forgotten.

    3.

    a. From this place; away from here: Get you hence!

    b. From this life.

    The grammar appears to be correct

    By the way, I work for a book distribution company, so I actually do know who Mary Balogh is.

  • Anonymous
    10 years ago

    Hence and thus are by common usage interchangeable, however according to the rules of grammar they are different. Hence should indicate future use - such as "Hence we will proceed as described." Thus should indicate the past in its usage, or to indicate a conclusion, such as, "The British and American troops fought to a standstill, thus no winner was declared."

    Common usage is no excuse for incorrect usage. I often interchange hence and thus when using them without thought. Tonight I heard a man say the following, "We ate like animals, we slept like animals, hence we were animals." This was incorrect, "... thus we were animals," would have been correct as cited above.

    Clearly the word in question was used to indicate a conclusion, not to describe future conditions. If the speaker had said, "We will live like animals, we will sleep like animals, hence we will be animals," the use of hence would have been correct. However, he did not, thus his use was incorrect.

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  • 10 years ago

    No, you're not. Instead of using HENCE, use FOR EXAMPLE, LIKE, SUCH AS, etc.

    Example of Hence: The school bully beat me up, hence the black eye.

    Hence is used to tell why something is the way it is.

  • 4 years ago

    Using Hence

  • 4 years ago

    so when you use a word such as

    hence, want to build a fence .....

    i do not want to build a fence

    but just for this useage

    to show direction of the active

    mostly kidding

    i suffer for poor writing skill

  • 10 years ago

    Yes. However, you shouldn't have ended your first sentence with the word "is".

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