165 grain bullet or 230 grain bullet for .45 ACP. self defense round?

I do not know why I have to contemplate this. It's a damn bullet. Nobody can outrun it. Is the speed decrease of the 230 grain to the 165 grain really something to look at in a self defense round?

I am not a handgunner yet as I am only 20, but I am doing my homework and want to get some experienced folks' answers.

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  • ?
    Lv 6
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Last answer of the night:

    You must be looking at one of those hyper velocity Cor-Bon rounds - Correct. I've been shooting for more than 50 years. I once shot on a firing line while standing right next to the Cor-Bon factory rep. Some pistoleros think that the faster they can get a bullet to go, the more energy it's going to dump into the target. I say, 'horsefeathers'.

    I'm a pistol instructor, an RSO, and a (former) worthy competitor. What I usually see is a lot of pistol shooters who've done an excellent job of, 'over-gunning' themselves. Never shoot a cartridge whose recoil you cannot easily control and absorb. These ultra-light, high velocity bullets have a very hard sharp recoil to them; they often induce flinching in gunmen who are old enough and experienced enough to know better than to use them.

    If a pistol/cartridge combination is too much for you to repeatedly fire accurately and easily then it's not the right combination for you. With the exception of very short (3" or less) 45 ACP barrels I always use 230 grain bullets - Often hardball, too. 230 grain 45 ACP pistol bullets got American fighting men through two world wars, and several major conflicts. With the (possible) exception of the people who got shot, nobody ever complained!

    The reason I like high quality hardball is because it'll punch right through heavy Winter clothing without stopping like a JHP round will. The usual flap revolves around the over-hyped idea of, 'excessive penetration'.

    I've been shooting for more than 50 years. During all this time I know of only a very few instances of authentic excessive penetration which caused harm to someone else. I know about plenty of clean misses and peripheral hits continuing to fly on through and do some sort of damage; but, almost no authentic examples of so-called excessive penetration AND harm to another.

    Once they're, 'in the air' ALL bullets are dangerous and potentially lethal. Experience has taught me that as long as you obey Cooper's Fourth Rule of Gun Safety, and line up your bullet path angles correctly then your shots are going to be as safe as you're capable of making them.

    Super-duper, whiz-bang ammo really isn't needed. Neither are so-called, 'low penetration' jacketed hollow points. A safe accurate shot is a safe accurate shot. If your background isn't clear then don't take the shot - That's what bullet flight path angles are all about. (I've stopped a lot of wild game with FMJ and JSP bullets. Almost none with JHP ammo, though. That should tell you something.)

    If I were going out to buy more 45 ACP ammo than I'm presently holding in inventory, I'd try to find more Fiocchi 45 ACP FMJ ammo. Barring that, I'd get Hornady, 'Critical Defense' FTX cartridges. Buy the way, forget about, 'outrunning' a bullet. It's not how fast it goes, or how hard it hits. Numerous targets have taken multiple hits from large caliber pistol gunfire and still lived long enough to kill the person shooting at them.

    Anytime you assess a pistol cartridge you've got to put all of the important factors together. Bullet: caliber, weight, nose design, cross-sectional density, center-of-gravity, muzzle energy, and muzzle velocity too. The last important component of every ultimately effective bullet is, 'shot placement'; and THAT is entirely up to the shooter. OK.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    165 grain bullet or 230 grain bullet for .45 ACP. self defense round?

    I do not know why I have to contemplate this. It's a damn bullet. Nobody can outrun it. Is the speed decrease of the 230 grain to the 165 grain really something to look at in a self defense round?

    I am not a handgunner yet as I am only 20, but I am doing my homework and want to get some...

    Source(s): 165 grain bullet 230 grain bullet 45 acp defense round: https://biturl.im/DZguw
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  • 3 years ago

    1

    Source(s): How Defend Yourself http://netint.info/UltimateSelfDefenseGuide
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  • MJ
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    Depends. I'll give a little background.

    165 gr. .45 ACP rounds are best used in short barrels where you want to maintain enough velocity to make JHP bullet expansion likely. Any 165 gr. load, even the ones that are loaded hot, will also recoil less than your standard 230 gr. load. The 165 gr. bullet will shoot lower at short/moderate range due to getting out of the barrel more quickly, before recoil pushes the muzzle up. (As all factory self-defense 165 gr. loadings move at much higher velocity than 230 gr.)

    In a nutshell, you get light recoil & lots of bullet expansion from the 165 gr. loads.

    Here's what the 165 gr. loads give up. Penetration. 230 gr. bullets almost always penetrate deeper. And most .45 ACP chambered handguns have sights that are regulated for 230 gr. bullets.

    I've used both weights, and I prefer something in the 230 gr. weight overall. But 165 gr. has a few positives, as you can see. How long is your barrel?

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  • 4 years ago

    A lot of people swear by the 230 grain bullets but I like the lighter ones as they allow for a quicker follow up shot since less recoil. Either should do fine for defensive proposes and +P loads should stop most any two legged target. The .45 size wound channel is what makes them effective. I would carry the 230's in a cold climate where heavy or leather coats may hamper penetration.

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  • Lisa
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/avLJd

    The key is to go with the most modern design bullets. Many of the heavy and relatively new offerings like the Federal Tactical, Speer Gold Dot or Winchester Ranger T in 230 grain are going to out perform the older designs in either a 200 or 230 grain offering. I would not get hung up on the "perfect" bullet. Practice with which ever load you choose. Being able to draw and place your shots quickly and accurately are going to prevail over someone with a magic bullet and poor placement. Remember, you can't miss fast enough to stop an attacker...

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  • akluis
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    the bullet design type is much more important than bullet weight.

    Premium hollow points (named hollow point like Golden Saber, Hydra-shock, etc) are the best, basic hollow points (HP) are next, exposed lead nose bullets of any shape would be third and Full metal jacket (FMJ) would be fourth.

    So I'd take a 165 HP over a 230 grain FMJ...but a 230 grain HP over a 165 grain FMJ

    so, let's say amongst all the premium hollow points, which is better? In that case, NEITHER. A middle ground choice like 180 or 200 is superior and even amongst that set, getting the one that feeds most reliably in your gun and gives the best group in your gun, THAT is what is important.

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  • 9 years ago

    Lol, your not a handgunner and your 20? I live in Texas so I went out a pistola the first day I turned 18. I had to go with a 9mm because I really can't afford to shoot as much as I'd like to with .40 or .45. With that being said it is generally accepted that the .45ACP is pretty much of a death ray so I'd personally go heavy if you can handle alil more recoil. My carry round is Winchester SXT 147 which is heavy for a 9mm but when you carry a 9 you might want to consider going heavy. I find that the speed of a 9mm or .45 over pentrates with lighter weights but often gets caught inside soft tissue targets. The goal with a .45 ACP shot is to immobilize the target and honestly either will do. Since you don't already have a pistol I suggest getting a 9mm. They have low recoil and high capacity so in the end your a lot better off. Get some good hollow point defensive rounds and become familiar with your handgun through actually range time. 9mm is $22 for a box of 100rd winchester white box after tax. .45ACP is more like $15-18 for a box of 50! I do plan to buy a .45ACP 1911 when I graduate college though because I appreciate the benefits of the larger caliber but I'm still a poor college student. I'll get off my soap box now.

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  • daviss
    Lv 4
    3 years ago

    45 Acp Self Defense Ammo

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  • 9 years ago

    Best Results will be obtained by using the 230 grain jacketed hollow point bullet for Self-defense purposes.*

    Source(s): * Run like a Deer.*..............Fly lke an Eagle.*~~
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