Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureReligion & Spirituality · 9 years ago

Why do people think the separation of church and state?

Was recently created by godless heathen only to benefit nontheists?

When it was Roger Williams, a baptist minister, who in 1636 formed Rhode Island as a religious safe haven.

So in other words, it all started with a clergyman to benefit all religions and people without religion.

Update:

@dazed&confused

That was when the term was coined, not the actual idea.

Update 2:

@Reverend Red Mage

Roger Williams died 60 years before Thomas Jefferson was born.

Update 4:

@MikeusCookus

How is that relevant?

13 Answers

Relevance
  • 9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    Let's see what religious folks have done in the name of their religion:

    I am angry with the Pope’s March 2009 statement that condom use helps spread AIDS in Africa.

    I'm angry that women are dying of AIDS in Africa and South America because the Catholic Church has convinced them that using condoms makes baby Jesus cry

    I'm angry that women are having septic abortions -- or are being forced to have unwanted children who they resent and mistreat -- because religious organizations have gotten laws passed making abortion illegal or inaccessible.

    And I'm angry that Jerry Falwell blamed 9/11 on pagans, abortionists, feminists, gays and lesbians, the ACLU, and the People For the American Way. I'm angry that the theology of a wrathful God exacting revenge against pagans and abortionists by sending radical Muslims to blow up a building full of secretaries and investment bankers... this was a theology held by a powerful, widely-respected religious leader with millions of followers.

    I'm angry that huge swaths of public policy in this country -- not just on same-sex marriage, but on abortion and stem-cell research and sex education in schools -- are being based, not on evidence of which policies do and don't work and what is and isn't true about the world, but on religious texts written hundreds or thousands of years ago, and on their own personal feelings about how those texts should be interpreted, with no supporting evidence whatsoever -- and no apparent concept of why any evidence should be needed.

    I get angry when believers say that they can know the truth -- the greatest truth of all about the nature of the universe, namely the source of all existence -- simply by sitting quietly and listening to their heart... and then accuse atheists of being arrogant. (This isn't just arrogant towards atheists and naturalists, either. It's arrogant towards people of other religions who have sat just as quietly, listened to their hearts with just as much sincerity, and come to completely opposite conclusions about God and the soul and the universe.)

    I get angry when believers treat the gaps in science and scientific knowledge as somehow proof of the existence of God. I get angry when, despite a thousands-of-years-old pattern of supernatural explanations being consistently and repeatedly replaced with natural ones, they still think every single unexplained phenomenon can be best explained by God. And I'm angry that, whenever a gap in our knowledge does get filled in, believers either try to suppress it (see above re: evolution in the schools), or else say, "Okay, that part of the world isn't supernatural... but what about this gap over here? Can you explain that, Mr. Smarty-Pants Scientist? You can't! It must be God!"

    I get angry when believers say at the beginning of an argument that their belief is based on reason and evidence, and at the end of the argument say things like, "It just seems that way to me," or, "I feel it in my heart"... as if that were a clincher.

  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    It was set up so that the government could not establish nor require anyone to participate in a state-run religion, and so that the government could not impede the free practice of anyone's religion.

    Now technically, this did not actually apply to everyone -- the native Americans and the Roman Catholics were not exactly allowed to practice their religion without prejudice, nor were the African slaves. However, the intention was in the right place.

  • James
    Lv 4
    9 years ago

    I think that if you were to examine history a little more you might find references to the subject. Including as far back as the Roman Empire. Even the Christian Bible has a reference in the verse which states, "render unto Caesar what is Caesars, Render unto God what is Gods. Obviously meaning that the church and state should not be together, but separate entities and operate independently as well.

  • 9 years ago

    I don't know anyone who thinks like that.

    I do know many that misunderstand what the issue was.

    Many founders of the USA were refugees from discrimination.

    Many countries of the Old World were theocracies.

    That meant that religion was imposed by the state.

    That problem still exists today in the middle-east.

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Precisely. Roger Williams felt that God and religion were actually too important and personal to be mixed with something as corrupt as government, so he wanted it out.

    Thomas Jefferson, a friend of his, agreed, but for the opposite reason. And you all know where that led.

    Source(s): Representing Rhode Island up in this hizzy.
  • 9 years ago

    At least 5 of the early state constitutions indicated that you had to believe in God and some specifically profess that Jesus was Lord and the bible was true in order to hold office.

  • 9 years ago

    actually separation of church and state was coined by Thomas Jefferson in a letter to a Baptist minister friend but yeah, facts are such an inconvenience.

  • Elihu
    Lv 4
    9 years ago

    I do not know.

    Please check your facts........Roger Williams was a minister; The rest of your presentation is incorrect.

    Source(s): Factual History.
  • 9 years ago

    It's essential in a multicultural society.

  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Theists can fool themselves into believing anything.

    Take that whole "I am a Zombie, and you are now free of sin" thing.

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