What is the origin of this quote?

All my life I have heard the phrase "Only the good die young". or perhaps this: "You ask why the good die young. It is to save them from the wrath that is to come" I always assumed that this is in the Bible, but evidently not. I have done a Strong's Concordance search and not one word gives reference to this. I looked it up on the net and all I got was the lyrics to some popular song that uses this phrase. Could it be from Shakespeare? Does anyone out there know? Thanx.<(((><

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  • 9 years ago
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    The long history of the saying began with the ancient version, 'Whom the gods love dies young,' and a touching story of how the proverb originated. As told by the Greek historian Herodotus in 'History' (c. 445 B.C.), the story concerns two especially favored youths who, replacing two missing oxen, hitched themselves to a cart and carried their mother to a festival for the goddess Hera. At the temple, the grateful mother asked Hera to reward her sons with the greatest gift anyone might receive, whereupon her sons lay down to sleep and never woke again."

    The most recent version, 'The good die young,' can be traced back to William Wordsworth's 'The Excursion' and the lines, 'The good die first, And they whose hearts are dry as summer dust burn Burn to the socket'." From "Wise Words and Wives' Tales: The Origins, Meanings and Time-Honored Wisdom of Proverbs and Folk Sayings Olde and New" by Stuart Flexner and Doris Flexner

    Hope this helps

    Source(s): Dayuum, I just deleted the webpage and my computer is so retarded that it does not store history D: It was something like 'quotemeanings.com'
  • Cheryl
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    “This is my shield. I bear it before me into battle, but it is not mine alone. It protects my brother on my left. It protects my city. I will never let my brother out of its shadow nor my city out of its shelter. I will die with my shield before me facing the enemy.” This quote is from the book "Gate of Fire" by Steven Pressfield. A 1998 historical fiction. Attributed to the character Alexandros. I can't find anything regarding your exact quote, but the similarity is close. I suspect that it was originally a Spartan proverb that has 'changed' over the years. Or perhaps Steven knew the original quote and did some poetic license. cheers

  • 3 years ago

    The Good Die Young Quotes

  • 4 years ago

    For the best answers, search on this site https://shorturl.im/3mZWC

    Not sure of who the original author was, but this is where it comes from. Gates of Fire by Stephen Pressfield. The battle of Thermopylae In the summer 480 BC, the Battle of Thermopylae was fought at a four-mile long, narrow rocky pass in Northern Greece between the mountains and the sea. A small force of Greeks, led by the Spartans, used the pass as a choke point and for three days held the massive and mighty Persian Army -- buying time for the Greeks to rally their forces. The battle pitted the Persian King, Xerxes I, against the King of Sparta, Leonidas. Leonidas sent most of his troops in retreat while he and his 300-man royal guard of Spartans fought valiantly to the last man, killing over 20,000 Persians. It was one of the greatest military stands in history and afterwards the Greeks defeated the Persians in the naval battle at Salamis and a land campaign, near Thebes. The Spartans’ battlefield prowess reflected their culture, a culture which has familiar themes today. "A king [Leader] does not abide within his tent while his men bleed and die upon the field. A king [Leader] does not dine while his men go hungry, nor sleep when they stand at watch upon the wall. A king [Leader] does not command his men’s loyalty through fear nor purchase it with gold; he earns their love by the sweat of his own back and the pains he endures for their sake. That which comprises the harshest burden, a king [Leader] lifts first and sets down last. A king [Leader] does not require service of those he leads but provides it to them. He serves them, not they him. A king [Leader] does not expend his substance to enslave men, but by his conduct and example makes them free." This is what leadership is about. Semper Fi and hope this helps

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  • 4 years ago

    This Site Might Help You.

    RE:

    What is the origin of this quote?

    All my life I have heard the phrase &quot;Only the good die young&quot;. or perhaps this: &quot;You ask why the good die young. It is to save them from the wrath that is to come&quot; I always assumed that this is in the Bible, but evidently not. I have done a Strong&#39;s Concordance search and...

    Source(s): origin quote: https://shortly.im/bMNwV
    • William4 years agoReport

      The good die young and the wicked live on in hopes of redemption I heard this on a movie

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