Christians: What do you think makes something a "curse word" or profanity?

For instance, I've read about people in England being offended when an American describes an incident as "bloody" because for them that seems to be a curse word.

Or (hope I don't offend) I've seen Chinese restaurants with a name where one word is pronounced the same as our "F" Word although it is spelled without a "C" and it would sound like a curse word to an American and yet it has a completely different meaning in Chinese.

So then, what exactly is a Christian to consider when they are concerned about not using "foul language" or "curse words"?

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago
    Best Answer

    Well Jared Wellman from the Carm web site concerning this issue had this to say on the Topic, I read it and agree with it..

    Cursing is our way of describing words that are, for the most part, culturally or socially unacceptable. It is a slippery slope, however, to define a curse word because words are always taking on new meanings. Some curse words in the English language are actually authorized words to describe authentic things but have taken on a new meaning as time has progressed. Because of this, it is nearly impossible to create a canonized list of words that are considered curses. Nevertheless, it can be concluded that there are words that are purely crude or demeaning and are therefore unequivocally curse words.

    It needs to be understood that cursing can also include any verbal expression of a word that may not necessarily be considered a traditional curse word. This means that the understanding of cursing needs to be expanded to not only include culturally or socially unacceptable words, but any word that is used to demean another individual or express extreme dissatisfaction with a particular situation, especially when that dissatisfaction is directed toward God. Christians are often guilty of substituting more culturally acceptable words in place of unacceptable words to describe their dissatisfaction with a situation, or even in reference to an individual. These are called euphemisms and cannot be considered justified alternatives.

    http://carm.org/cursing

    Source(s): TLS
  • 9 years ago

    Christians, and everybody, should consider the words in the context they are used.

    In the chinesse restaurant example you present a mandarin (or in other chinesse language) word is being compared to an curse word in english or american english. Not matter how similar the two words look or sound they are not the same word, even if they sound or are written exactlt they are still two different words. Therefore, an american christian should not get offended if seeing the word at a mandarin / chinesse menu or sign.

    It is more difficult in the "bloody" example because it is in the same language, english. Here one must check the meaning of the word and remember that a word may have more than one meaning, and meanings may change by region or country. I will give you another example from my main language: Spanish. In most spanish speaking places "bicho" is a informal word for a little bug. But in Puerto Rico, a bug is an "insecto" (insect); bicho is a dirty word for penis. Then a christian puertorrican should before being offended when hearing 'bicho" is to analyze where and how the word is used, in which context.

    * Is the speaker from Puerto Rico? or from Venezuela or Mexico?

    * The conversation is about ants, bees, flies? or about sex?

  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    To me as a Christian it would be words that offend God because He knows our thoughts, words, and hearts. He's watching and listening and discerning. Profanity comes from what is already in the heart. If you are not right with God, our mouths and actions manifest the darkness from within.

    We are told clearly not to take the Lord's name in vain but many use this type of terminology as easily as honey, love, great ... it becomes second nature to them. When someone says "GD" you, they are actually asking God to damn that person whether they mean it or not. That is taking the Lord's name in vain. We will all be judged by our "works" or lifestyles at some point in time so why make it harder on yourself? Clean up those foul mouths and develop a decent vocabulary to replace them.

  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    In England 'bloody' is more of a slang word than a 'curse' word and most would not be offended by it.

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  • 9 years ago

    To me just anything rude or ignorant. Sure I curse a little now and then, but not much. Just with friends messing around. I don't believe it's sinful, but I wouldn't talk that way to a female or co-working, etc.

  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Profanities are entirely in societal perceptions. For instance, why is the 'S' word bad, but poop is not? What makes the 'F' word vulgar, but not screw? Somewhere in antiquity someone decided that they didn't like certain words, declared them to be profane, and published their views. People, being fundamentally sheep, went along with it, not wanting to expend the energy to argue the points. Those @$#&$@*% lazy %&@##@%&*.

  • 9 years ago

    My first thought would have to be, "what's in your heart at the time." If your heart is hardened and you are in anger or negative, God commands against that...

  • Anonymous
    9 years ago

    Foul language and curse words are not the same thing.

    To curse someone is to damn them. So, "damn" is the only true curse word (or it should be according to the Bible).

    Foul language is just that: Language that is foul.

  • Jake
    Lv 5
    9 years ago

    Either taking God's Name in vain or using a word in wrongful anger (as opposed to holy rage) or in a sexual manner. Jesus never gave us a list of forbidden words. It depends more on how the word is used than on the word itself.

    Source(s): Christian
  • 9 years ago

    This is one of my pet peeves when it comes to anyone. They're just words. They don't have any meaning other than what you put into them.

    There's a huge difference between "you're a f*cking b*stard and I hope you die." and "I just stubbed my f*cking toe, ouch that hurt."

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