Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Society & CultureLanguages · 10 years ago

What tense is this 'il est touché' in French?

What tense is it when you put etre + the past participle. I am not talking about the verbs that take etre verbs (Dr & Mrs Vandertramp) because I am sure certain phrases such toucher do not take etre usually. So what is this tense? And are there any other verbs that use that construction?

Thank you for any answers - Mock A level in French and I would love to clear this up! :)

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  • 10 years ago
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    "Il est touché" is the present in the passive voice . I think it's the same in English . When the subject of the verb doesn't do the action expressed by the verb but is subjected to this action done by somebody or something else :

    there's a thing called the passive voice, whose construction is the verb être + past participle of the main verb . In fact it looks like the "passé composé", except those main verbs use the verb avoir for compound tenses . Such as "toucher" . But you chose an uneasy example, because "je suis touché" also means" I'm affected" .

    Take any other verb, like aimer . We say " il a aimé ce film " at passé compôsé, and " il est aimé par ses enfants" in the passive voice at present .

    Il est touché is the present in the passive voice . ( if it doesn't mean " he's affected " in this precise case ) .

    If you want to say this at passé composé it will be " il a été touché" , though the normal passé composé of toucher ( active voice ) is " il a touché" .

    Source(s): t present
  • 10 years ago

    Present.

    Means literally 'it/he is affected.'

    The past participle can be taken as an adjective in some instances, such as this.

    The verbs that can use this construction are verbs whose English translation are 'to be...'

  • 10 years ago

    Present passive tense. 3rd personne du singulier .

  • 10 years ago

    I think it's present but not sure

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  • 10 years ago

    oui

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