Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Politics & GovernmentMilitary · 9 years ago

how to qualify to be a nurse in the military?

im graduating from my nursing program with an associates. i've decided i want to join the military but in the reserves preferably air national guard reserves or the air force. but i've heard they require a bachelors. Does anyone know any other branches that i'll be able to get in with an associates degree?

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  • Anonymous
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    If you wish to be a nurse in the Army you have two choices. You can be a RN (Registered Nurse) or a LPN (Licensed Practical Nurse a.k.a. Licensed Vocational Nurse).

    A RN, in the Active Army, must have a BSN, at a minimum. This is required prior to joining as a nurse. You may be able to join the Reserves with an ASN/ADN, but will be required to complete your BSN prior to promotion to higher ranks. The other option is to finish your BSN first and then join, as an officer.

    If you wish to have your student loans paid off, it would be an option to join, as enlisted, in the MOS 68WM6. HOWEVER, you would be required to have your LPN license first, or attend the 68WM6 school when you join - you would need to check with a recruiter, as the M6 option was recently not being offered to initial entry soldiers. If allowed to join as a 68WM6, you could later complete your BSN and apply for a commission. In the M6 school, we had a couple of students who did the enlisted route, to have their student loans paid off, that already had their RN.

    If you are able to obtain your LPN license, prior to joining, you could join under the stripes for skills program, which allows you to enter with a higher rank. This would eliminate the need for you to attend the M6 portion, but you would still have to go through the 68W school to obtain the EMT-B training. If you have EMT-B already, you could also skip a portion of that training.

    If you would rather go to the M6 school, you could talk to a recruiter about the MOS (Job series) 68WM6. 68W is the initial school teaching you to be a Medic, and is taught at Ft Sam Houston in San Antonio, TX. The M6 portion is a secondary school that is 52 weeks long. The M6 phase 1 is conducted at Ft Sam Houston, and the phase 2 & 3 portions are conducted at several other Army posts in the US. After successful completion of that portion you will have to obtain your LPN license by taking the NCLEX-PN test (which is required for completion of the course). This is an option if you do not wish to wait to complete your BSN, do not have the money for school, or would like to have your student loans paid off.

    After the M6 school you could seek to continue to finish your RN degree. If you do this while active duty it takes planning and a longer than if you went to school full time. If you are in a field unit, or deploy, this could make it take even longer. However, there are accredited schools that offer LPN-BSN and RN-BSN completion programs. Some of the required credit hours can be obtained by taking DANTES, CLEP tests & Excelsior Nursing tests.

    IF you can not, or do not obtain your LPN license, and cannot/do not wish to attend the M6 school, the you could look at joining in another MOS. You could still later finish your BSN and apply for a commission.

    Good luck.

    Source(s): Retired Army Former 68WM6 AIT Instructor RN
  • Anonymous
    6 years ago

    Hello,

    In response to this question, How to qualify to be a nurse in the military?, I can tell you that this site http://asknursingonline.com might help you in your situation

    As you described; "im graduating from my nursing program with an associates. i've decided i want to join the military but in the reserves preferably air national guard reserves or the air force. but i've heard they require a bachelors. Does anyone know any other branches that i'll be able to get in with an associates degree?" it may help you.

    Good Luck :)

  • 4 years ago

    If you are only looking to work for a VA hospital.. then I would have to say you should apply as a civilian nurse for the VA. There is a huge difference between the requirements for a civilian nurse working for the VA and a military trained nurse working for the VA. Well, you may be asking, who am I to tell you this. Well, I am a nurse and I have observed and reviewed extensively on the difference between entering as a civilian to a VA hospital and as a military nurse. 1. Civilians nurses dont need to go through boot camp 2. Civilians nurses dont risk getting deployed 1. Military nurses has to go through the enlisted bootcamp or officer training 2. Military nurses gets trained hands on 1 on 1 by a military nurse 3. MIlitary nurses KNOWS they are getting deployed (regardless of where, they will oblige)

  • ZER0
    Lv 5
    9 years ago

    The Air Force is actively seeking nurses (RN or higher) to serve. It's the only offer in the military that will make you an officer with an associates degree. You'll start out as a second lieutenant and work your way up. See this link for information on active Air Force: http://airforce.com/opportunities/healthcare/caree...

    Source(s): Airmen First Class, United States Air Force. Later this year I'm going to finish my RN degree and hopefully follow the same path!
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  • .
    Lv 5
    9 years ago

    The U.S. Army Reserves will accept an Associate Degree RN but you must obtain a BSN by the time you go up to the promotion board for Captain.

  • Adam
    Lv 4
    9 years ago

    I cant speak for any other branch but the US Army Reserves will commission you as an officer with an ASN.

  • 9 years ago

    No ASN/ADN allowed in the military. Only BSN.

    If you have a BSN, you become an officer in any branch that you join as a nurse.

  • Mrsjvb
    Lv 7
    9 years ago

    the three Branches that use Nurses require a BSN in Hand.

    you can ENLIST as an LPN in the Army,

  • Anonymous
    7 years ago

    From this site http://mynursinghelp.com you can find the necessary information

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