In Swedish, what is the difference between "är" and "ligger"?

I am currently learning Swedish and have come across two different words for the "to be" verb. By far the most common is "är", where we English speakers get the word "are". It is used in almost all incidences without personal conjugation. However, I've found that in rare cases,... show more I am currently learning Swedish and have come across two different words for the "to be" verb. By far the most common is "är", where we English speakers get the word "are". It is used in almost all incidences without personal conjugation. However, I've found that in rare cases, usually only when describing things like "land" (city) and "bro" (bridge), a different word is used: "ligger". I typed this into google translate and it translated as "is". I am thoroughly confused, as I thought "är" was the only to be verb.
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