Anonymous
Anonymous asked in Science & MathematicsPhysics · 9 years ago

What do you think is the marine blue light shinning from the 2nd nuclear reactor plant at Fukushima Japan?

You can see the blue light on the web listed below. http://tagosakuga.blog79.fc2.com/blog-entry-50.htm... Someone think that light may be Cherenkov light. Is it dangerous?

Update:

Thank you Jerry! We can see the blue light only from the second reactor. And We can see no light anywhere at night at this plant. And the we found there is more than 1sv/h radiation near 2nd reactor today. I'm lving near Fukushima Japan. So I have to decide soon whether or not we should take refuge from Tokyo.

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  • JerryJ
    Lv 7
    9 years ago
    Favorite Answer

    More likely it's emergency lighting.

    Here is an informative article describing the situation:

    http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/13/fukushima-si...

    And here is where you find current, factual status information:

    http://www.iaea.org/newscenter/news/tsunamiupdate0...

    And here is a chart that helps make sense of the numbers:

    http://www.xkcd.com/radiation/

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  • 9 years ago

    Cherenkov radiation is electromagnetic radiation emitted when a charged particle (such as an electron) passes through a dielectric medium at a speed greater than the phase velocity of light in that medium. The charged particles polarize the molecules of that medium, which then turn back rapidly to their ground state, emitting radiation in the process. The characteristic blue glow of nuclear reactors is due to Cherenkov radiation..Cherenkov radiation is used to detect high-energy charged particles. In pool-type nuclear reactors, the intensity of Cherenkov radiation is related to the frequency of the fission events that produce high-energy electrons, and hence is a measure of the intensity of the reaction. Similarly, Cherenkov radiation is used to characterize the remaining radioactivity of spent fuel rods.

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