Help! The Pequod from Moby Dick!?

I have to write a creative paper on why ahab decided to name the ship Pequod. There was a Native American Tribe called the "Pequot" and I'm going to make it have to do with that, but any ideas for specifics?

Thanks!

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  • 9 years ago
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    From an online literature study guide on Moby Dick:

    Quote:

    "The Pequod and the Pequots

    The Pequod derives its name from "Pequot," the name of a small band of American Indians of the Algonquian (or Algonkian) language group. The Pequots lived on the east coast of the New World in what is now Connecticut. When British expansionism provoked a war with these Indians, the British killed many of them. Surviving Pequots were later tracked down and killed, sold into slavery, or absorbed into other tribes. By Herman Melville’s time, the Pequots had all but disappeared from America. Thus, the word "Pequot" became associated with eventual death and destruction. Melville changed the letter “t” to “d” in naming Ahab’s ship. "

    Source:

    http://www.cummingsstudyguides.net/Guides3/MobyDic...

    A sense of doom and death runs through the novel. The Pequot tribe was doomed by contact with the British colonists. The ship the Pequod was also doomed. Its voyage was a voyage of death.

    If you go to your local library (public library or campus library, if you are a college student) and ask a reference librarian there to help you find literary criticism about the novel, Moby Dick, especially any that focuses on the name of the ship and the philosophies of the Transcendentalists of the time, you will probably find more info to help you write your paper.

    The literary criticism series Nineteenth Century Literary Criticism (in the library collection) probably has some good info for you. Your library may subscribe to an electronic database (or 2) for literary criticism, which is accessible via the library web pages and your valid library card. Ask a librarian about that, too.

    To help get you started, here is a link to some brief info about the Pequot tribe and Melville's selection of a different spelling of the tribe's name for his ship:

    http://www.readmoby.com/mason_pequod.html

    Melville thought the Pequot tribe had been totally wiped out, by the way.

    Best wishes

    Source(s): Reference/information librarian
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  • Cathy
    Lv 4
    4 years ago

    I like your Moby Dick question, but you already haved several fascinating answers, so I'm gonna by-pass this one. As several of your answerers indicate, Moby Dick (to me, at least) is really about two huge natural monsters: Moby Dick himself, or Nature, and Ahab himself, or Human Nature. The ship's crew is pitted against them both, just as we all are in other way or another. However, I must admit I have never been able to think of Moby Dick as THE great American novel. Huck Finn gets that nod from me. For Melville, I like several shorter pieces better, esp. Billy Budd, "Bartleby the Scrivener," and "Benito Cereno." I really like Robert Lowell's dramatization of some of these in Old Glory, which doesn't get much attention these days. But there were a few decades during which the US did indeed declare its independence from European literature. None of these works, I'm convinced, could ever have been conceived or written anywhere else: Ralph Waldo Emerson, The American Scholar and Essays (1&2); Thoreau, Walden; Hawthorne, Scarlet Letter; Poe, short stories; Melville, Moby Dick; Whitman, Leaves of Grass; then, Twain, Huck Finn; and all of Emily Dickinson!! The works of each one was a literary Declaration of Independence.

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  • Anonymous
    5 years ago

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    RE:

    Help! The Pequod from Moby Dick!?

    I have to write a creative paper on why ahab decided to name the ship Pequod. There was a Native American Tribe called the "Pequot" and I'm going to make it have to do with that, but any ideas for specifics?

    Thanks!

    Source(s): pequod moby dick: https://biturl.im/8Pv3a
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  • 3 years ago

    The Pequod

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