What are some lovely wordless classical soprano pieces?

Kindly suggest really pretty pieces like:

Bachianas Brasileiras No.5 Aria Cantilena (Villa Lobos) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NxzP1XPCGJE

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Vocalise (Rachmaninov) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvBwoEmWciw

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It doesn't have to be entirely wordless. Bachianas Brasileiras have words in the middle of the song, but mostly it's wordless. Thank you! :)

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  • 9 years ago
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    That should be "Pastorale" by Igor Stravinsky. You can find the sheet music on IMSLP, but it is public domain only in the U.S. and not Canada (according to the site).

    Ralph Vaughan Williams--"Three Vocalises for Soprano and Clarinet"

    http://www.classicalarchives.com/work/42517.html

    (still under copyright--if you like it you can buy it from here:http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/Three-Vocalise...

    These have lyrics actually--but it has that kind of "feel" to it--very gorgeous.

    From "Chants d'Auvergne" (Songs of Auvergne) by Jospeh Canteloube--"Bailero"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lalGP1_hgyI

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    &feature=related

    (still under copyright--it's easily found on most commercial sheet music sites)

    Similarly--Ravel's

    "Chanson Espagnole" (you might want to see if there is a higher key)

    but he did write this vocalise "Vocalise en forme der Habenera"

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f9gw7p3fpJ0

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    &feature=related

    And this "Kaddish" also Ravel

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T673FBPYVjE

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    You can find other vocalises (which is a wordless song)--by simply searching under that term, but quite a few were written more for vocal exercises and warmups.

    For example:

    http://imslp.org/wiki/15_Vocalises_pour_soprano_ou...

    I think you enjoy that kind of floating, almost etheral kind of melody (I do--it's challenging to sing because it takes so much breath control, but so beautiful)

    I'm sure you heard this duet from Delibes' opera "Lakme"--

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpT7pK9A61A

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    http://www.music-for-music-teachers.com/flower-due... (free)

    It's more upbeat, but fun. There are a lot of runs in it. "Voices of Spring" Strauss, sung in the original German by Korean operatic soprano Sumi Jo

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8rOr8yZrEU

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    Then there's "Alleluja" from Mozart's Exsultate Jubilate (check out the other parts too)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTkCHdkZVyM

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    &feature=related (start 7:18)

    sheet music available on IMSLP

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  • 9 years ago

    Most of the wordless music using a soprano are named, as the Rachmaninov piece is named, "Vocalise". I know Gabriel Faure wrote one (quite famous, often, senselessly used as incidental music to Shakespeare plays!)

    Check out imslp.org, and put vocalise in the search box. You'll get back things like:

    Vocalise-etude, Gabriel Faure

    Sonata-Vocalise (and suite-vocalise, which might be the same thing) Medtner

    Vocalise etude, Florent Schmitt

    Le Rossignol, Sainte-saens

    Vocalise-Etude en forme en Habenera, Ravel

    and many others.

    If they are not written for soprano, there may be transcriptions available, either on imslp or from commercial ventures, which move the piece into the soprano range.

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  • 9 years ago

    There are few wordless soprano pieces, but the most famous may very well be the Vocalise, No. 14, Op. 34, by Sergei Rachmaninoff.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gERptKVcxTM

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  • Anonymous
    4 years ago

    Villa Lobos Imslp

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  • 9 years ago

    How about Patorale by Stravinsky?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8X-HWkfd7Co

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